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Posted: 2019-04-18 09:03:00
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Virginia Hall was an American spy who worked for Britain and the U.S. and played a key role in undermining the Nazi occupation of France during World War II. Her story was rarely told — until...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:27:34
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Woods' recent Masters title follows a 10-year drought of major tournament victories. Jeff Benedict, co-author of Tiger Woods, says: "What we're seeing now is someone who loves what he's doing."
Posted: 2019-04-16 17:59:05
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Bill McKibben, who first warned of climate change 30 years ago, says its effects are now upon us: "The idea that anybody's going to be immune from this anywhere is untrue." His new book is Falter.
Posted: 2019-04-16 09:05:00
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What Does It Mean To Be A Normal Person?
That is the question a the heart of the new book — Normal People — from the acclaimed Irish novelist Sally Rooney. She talks to NPR's Rachel Martin.
Posted: 2019-04-16 09:05:00
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'Late Bloomers' Makes The Case For Patience In A Culture Focused On Early Success
In an interview with NPR about his new book Late Bloomers, Forbes magazine publisher Rich Karlgaard talks about the idea that early achievement is not necessary for lifelong success.
Posted: 2019-04-15 19:06:00
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Biographer Robert Caro On Fame, Power And 'Working' To Uncover The Truth
The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist was never interested in only telling the stories of famous men. Instead, he says, "I wanted to use their lives to show how political power worked."
Posted: 2019-04-15 11:00:22
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For April, 3 Novels Of Love At Any Age, In Any Era
This month's romance roundup includes the latest in Lucy Parker's London Celebrities series, an older woman chucking convention in Victorian England, and a reworking of The Taming of the Shrew.
Posted: 2019-04-15 09:00:00
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'Women's Work' Delves Into Gender Roles At Home, And Relationships With Domestic Help
Former L.A. Times foreign correspondent Megan Stack talks with NPR about her new book, her relationships with her nannies, and the need to further involve men in conversations about work in the...
Posted: 2019-04-15 09:00:00
www.npr.org
'Women's Work' Delves Into Gender Roles At Home And Relationships With Domestic Help
Former L.A. Times foreign correspondent Megan Stack talks with NPR about her new book, her relationships with her nannies, and the need to further involve men in conversations about work in the...
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:01:50
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After Decades Of Comics, 'Cathy' Cartoonist Found Writing 'So Liberating'
Cathy Guisewite drew her comic strip for more than 30 years. Her new book is called Fifty Things that Aren't My Fault. Writing essays "was like coming home and taking off the Spanx," she says.

Posted: 2019-04-16 15:31:00
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These job-based programs can motivate employees to make some changes in behavior, research finds, but they don't seem to move the dial on workers' health status or employer spending on health...
Posted: 2019-04-15 19:05:00
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The popularity of weight loss apps, especially among younger people, has forced the traditional weight loss programs to revamp their models to include online, on-demand support.
Posted: 2019-04-14 21:01:00
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A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.
Posted: 2019-04-05 21:49:00
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Such Great Heights: 84-Year-Old Pole Vaulter Keeps Raising The Bar
Flo Filion Meiler was inspired to take up the event at 65 when she scoped out the competition. "I said to myself, you know, I think that I could do better than that."
Posted: 2019-04-04 16:14:27
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Attorneys General Sue Trump Administration Over School Nutrition Rollbacks
The suit, filed on behalf of six states and the District of Columbia, says the weakened federal nutrition standards for school meals are putting kids at greater risk of health problems linked...
Posted: 2019-04-03 22:31:00
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Bad Diets Are Responsible For More Deaths Than Smoking, Global Study Finds
Some 11 million deaths annually are linked to diet-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease, a study finds. Researchers say that makes diet the leading risk factor for deaths around the...
Posted: 2019-03-30 11:53:00
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After A Century, A Voice For The U.S. Salt Industry Goes Quiet
The Salt Institute spent decades questioning government efforts to limit Americans' sodium intake. Critics say the institute muddied the links between salt and health. Now it has shut its doors.
Posted: 2019-03-30 11:22:00
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Eating Fish May Help City Kids With Asthma Breathe Better
A research team tracked the diets and exposures to air pollution of kids inside Baltimore homes. Children with diets high in omega-3 fatty acids seemed less vulnerable to pollution's effect on...
Posted: 2019-03-27 20:12:00
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Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water
Fresh water quenches thirst almost instantly, but salt water doesn't. New research shows how cells in the gut and on the tongue help the brain keep just the right concentration of salt in our...
Posted: 2019-03-27 20:12:00
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Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water
Fresh water quenches thirst almost instantly, but salt water doesn't. New research shows how cells in the gut and on the tongue help the brain keep just the right concentration of salt in our...

Posted: 2019-04-18 09:00:25
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Her employer offered only a high-deductible health plan; that meant she'd have to pay up to $6,000 out of pocket each year. Advocates for patients say this sort of underinsurance is snatching...
Posted: 2019-04-17 21:12:00
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The latest advance is not only encouraging news for patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. It's a test case for all those scientists working to develop better gene therapy techniques.
Posted: 2019-04-16 15:01:00
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This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.
Posted: 2019-04-14 21:01:00
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High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:03:30
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How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:03:00
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How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
Posted: 2019-04-12 22:06:00
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Republican State Lawmakers Split Over Anti-Abortion Strategy
Ohio is the latest Republican-led state to pass a ban on abortion once a fetal heartbeat can be detected. But Tennessee this week backed off a similar bill, fearing costly legal battles. What...
Posted: 2019-04-11 18:01:13
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Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits
Scientists are learning how the party drug ketamine relieves depression so quickly — and why its effects fade over time.
Posted: 2019-04-11 18:01:00
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Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits
Scientists are learning how the party drug ketamine relieves depression so quickly — and why its effects fade over time.
Posted: 2019-04-11 09:00:00
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As Sanders Calls For 'Medicare-For-All,' A Twist On That Plan Gains Traction
"Medicare for America" would stop short of a full-blown expansion of Medicare. It would include copays from patients and a role for insurers. Could it survive health care's politics?

Posted: 2019-04-16 15:31:00
www.npr.org
These job-based programs can motivate employees to make some changes in behavior, research finds, but they don't seem to move the dial on workers' health status or employer spending on health...
Posted: 2019-04-16 15:01:00
www.npr.org
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.
Posted: 2019-04-15 19:21:00
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This year, the U.S. has confirmed 550 measles cases so far. A recent spike is connected to outbreaks in New York, but there are outbreaks in four other states too.
Posted: 2019-04-14 21:01:00
www.npr.org
High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:03:00
www.npr.org
How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
Posted: 2019-04-09 22:37:43
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New York Declares Health Emergency As Measles Spreads In Parts Of Brooklyn
"We cannot allow this dangerous disease to make a comeback here in New York City. We have to stop it now," Mayor Bill de Blasio said, announcing an order that calls for mandatory vaccinations.
Posted: 2019-04-08 09:02:00
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Prenatal Testing Can Ease Minds Or Heighten Anxieties
A variety of genetic tests are available to screen both fetus and parents. One option that's growing in popularity is called an expanded carrier screening. The results can be useful and overwhelming.
Posted: 2019-04-08 09:02:00
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Seasonal Sniffles? Immunotherapy Tablets Catch On As An Alternative To Allergy Shots
Many allergists have started to prescribe immunotherapy tablets to some of their patients. They're safe and convenient and, like allergy shots, they treat the root cause of your allergic misery.
Posted: 2019-04-04 15:03:00
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Opinion: Direct-To-Consumer Medicine Can Be Quick And Discreet, But What's Lost?
If you happily order your contact lenses online, why not get drugs for migraines or erectile dysfunction that way, too? Be careful, a medical student warns. Your "simple" self-diagnosis may be...
Posted: 2019-04-03 21:00:00
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Hepatitis C Not A Barrier For Organ Transplantation, Study Finds
Researchers found that antiviral drugs are effective in preventing transmission of the hepatitis C virus from donated hearts and lungs to recipients. The result could help reduce organ wait times.

Posted: 2019-04-17 21:12:00
www.npr.org
The latest advance is not only encouraging news for patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. It's a test case for all those scientists working to develop better gene therapy techniques.
Posted: 2019-04-16 15:01:03
www.npr.org
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness, and sickle cell disease.
Posted: 2019-04-16 15:01:00
www.npr.org
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.
Posted: 2019-04-15 19:21:00
www.npr.org
Measles Outbreak 'Accelerates,' Health Officials Warn
This year, the U.S. has confirmed 550 measles cases so far. A recent spike is connected to outbreaks in New York, but there are outbreaks in four other states too.
Posted: 2019-04-15 15:45:11
www.npr.org
Teen Dating Violence Can Lead To Homicide — And Girls Are The Most Common Victims
A study finds that about 7 percent of all teen homicides between 2003 and 2016 were committed by a romantic partner. The majority of victims were teen girls.
Posted: 2019-04-15 14:53:46
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5 Cool Things That Could Make The World A Better Place By 2030
The 5 recipients of the Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship predict how their projects will make the world a better place.
Posted: 2019-04-15 09:00:00
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For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears
For some kids with anxiety disorders, a new study suggests the best treatment might be teaching their parents new parenting skills.
Posted: 2019-04-15 09:00:00
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For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears
For some kids with anxiety disorders, a new study suggests the best treatment might be teaching their parents new parenting skills.
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:03:00
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How The Rock 'N Play Baby Sleeper Became Popular And Why It Was Recalled
NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer talks with baby sleep consultant and author Alexis Dubief about the recall of Fisher-Price's Rock 'n Play sleepers, which have had a devoted following among parents.
Posted: 2019-04-12 16:27:00
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Watchdogs Cite Lax Medical And Mental Health Treatment Of ICE Detainees
The Adelanto ICE Processing Center houses nearly 2,000 people in California. Federal, state and watchdog reviews say the Florida-based firm that runs Adelanto fails to provide adequate health...