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Posted: 2019-10-22 17:00:00
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Surgeon and researcher Marty Makary traveled the country talking to people about their experiences with health care. He learned that costs are poisoning Americans' relationships with medicine.
Posted: 2019-10-21 17:48:08
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Onstage, Joplin oozed confidence, sexuality and exuberance, but biographer Holly George-Warren describes the singer as a bookworm who worked hard to create her "blues feelin' mama" musical persona.
Posted: 2019-10-20 21:04:00
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NPR's Michel Martin speaks with comedian Ali Wong about her new book, Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets and Advice for Living Your Best Life.
Posted: 2019-10-19 21:06:00
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Book: 'Free Cyntoia'
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Cyntoia Brown-Long about her memoir, Free Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System.
Posted: 2019-10-19 12:08:00
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John Le Carré Fears For The Future In 'Agent Running In The Field'
Decades ago, Le Carré worked for British intelligence services MI5 and MI6. He has channeled that experience into more than 50 years of espionage thrillers.
Posted: 2019-10-19 12:08:00
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'Everybody's Other Than Everybody Else': Choreographer Mark Morris
The prolific dancer and company director has written Out Loud -- a memoir of hits and flops, childhood trauma and a lifetime at the forefront of modern dance.
Posted: 2019-10-17 18:27:28
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'Geography of Risk' Calculates Who Pays When A Storm Comes To Shore
Journalist Gilbert Gaul says federal subsidies encourage developers to keep building on the coasts — despite accelerating and increasing risks from climate change.
Posted: 2019-10-17 08:59:00
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Lupita Nyong'o On 'Sulwe'
NPR's Noel King speaks with Lupita Nyong'o about her new children's book, Sulwe.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:56:00
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18th Century Butts, Moving Statues And Other 'Metropolitan Stories'
Christine Coulson has written her debut novel about the hidden life of the place where she worked for 25 years: the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
Posted: 2019-10-16 17:57:54
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In 'Heaven, My Home' Attica Locke Shows A Part Of Texas We Don't Usually See
Locke says her new novel "was about place before it was about a character." The story follows a black ranger who patrols East Texas searching for the missing son of an Aryan Brotherhood leader.

Posted: 2019-10-15 09:01:00
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A Massachusetts pop-up gym aims to strengthen the bodies and spirits of LGBTQ+ clients, who haven't always been made to feel comfortable in other workout spaces.
Posted: 2019-10-12 19:14:24
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Accompanied by pacemakers and an electric car, the Kenyan runner set a record Saturday that was long considered not humanly possible. He clocked in at 1:59:40 on crossing the finish line in Austria.
Posted: 2019-10-10 12:20:38
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Most of the bans aim to curb emissions and protect pedestrians. The bans are also sometimes touted as a way to help fight obesity, but past studies suggest they don't have that effect.
Posted: 2019-10-07 09:05:00
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When Efforts To Eat 'Clean' Become An Unhealthy Obsession
Whether it's gluten or dairy, many people avoid certain types of foods these days. Sometimes, food avoidance can take over people's lives and veer into an eating disorder.
Posted: 2019-09-30 21:01:00
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No Need To Cut Back On Red Meat? Controversial New 'Guidelines' Lead To Outrage
A prominent medical journal has published a new recommendation from a group of scientists concluding there's no need to cut back on red and processed meats. This contradicts current guidelines.
Posted: 2019-09-30 09:06:31
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Just A Handful Of Nuts May Help Keep Us From Packing On The Pounds As We Age
U.S. adults put on about a pound a year on average. But people who had a regular nut-snacking habit put on less weight and had a lower risk of becoming obese over time, a new study finds.
Posted: 2019-09-26 15:31:38
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Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains
Research finds that triathletes who train too hard can impair a brain area involved in achieving goals such as winning a race. Fatigued athletes choose immediate gratification over long-term...
Posted: 2019-09-23 09:00:18
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Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help
Never mind a runner's high — the buzz some people say they get after a run. Neuroscientist Benedict Kolber was more interested in how to generate pain relief via a brisk walk. It can really...
Posted: 2019-09-22 11:00:56
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Soul Line Dancing: Come For The Fitness. Stay For The Friendships
Research show that when you add a social component to an exercise plan, you're more likely to stick to it. That's especially true of the steps, turns, beats and fun of soul line dancing.
Posted: 2019-09-18 19:49:00
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The Chess Grandmaster's Diet
Chess grandmasters spend hours sitting over game boards. And yet, high-level players lose 10 to 12 pounds on average over a 10-day tournament. ESPN's Aishwarya Kumar dug into that statistic.

Posted: 2019-10-23 09:00:24
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The technology behind e-cigarettes has changed over the years, and researchers are now finding evidence that the way different sorts of vaping devices and e-liquids interact could harm consumers.
Posted: 2019-10-22 20:21:53
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Calming techniques officers learn during training for intervening in a mental health crisis don't seem to work as well when a suspect is high on meth. Police say meth calls can be much more dangerous.
Posted: 2019-10-22 17:52:50
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The first global analysis of blood supply and demand finds that many developing countries are relying on risky emergency donations.
Posted: 2019-10-21 22:59:14
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The Placebo Effect Works And You Can Catch It From Your Doctor
Doctor-patient interactions can make a big difference to the effectiveness of treatments. In a new study, even a fake pain treatment helped when doctors believed it was real.
Posted: 2019-10-21 20:09:57
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Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes
A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
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Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-18 16:17:22
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What's Behind The Research Funding Gap For Black Scientists?
Black scientists more often seek grants for community health studies, but molecular-level research proposals win more funding. More diversity throughout the process could help close the gap,...
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:51:00
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Hospital Giant Sutter Health Agrees To Settlement In Big Antitrust Fight
Health care costs in Northern California, where Sutter Health dominates, are 20% to 30% higher than in Southern California, even after adjusting for cost of living. Settlement terms aren't yet...
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
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Doctors Faced With Tough Decisions Due To Shortage Of Drug Used To Treat Cancer
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Yoram Unguru, a hematologist and oncologist in Baltimore, about a shortage of vincristine, a drug used to treat childhood cancer.
Posted: 2019-10-16 09:05:00
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A Boy's Mysterious Illness Leads His Family On A Diagnostic Odyssey
Alex Yiu was born a healthy seeming baby. But by age 2, his muscle control and speech were deteriorating. His baffling condition took a decade to diagnose. The reanalysis of a DNA test was the...

Posted: 2019-10-23 09:00:24
www.npr.org
The technology behind e-cigarettes has changed over the years, and researchers are now finding evidence that the way different sorts of vaping devices and e-liquids interact could harm consumers.
Posted: 2019-10-22 17:00:00
www.npr.org
Surgeon and researcher Marty Makary traveled the country talking to people about their experiences with health care. He learned that costs are poisoning Americans' relationships with medicine.
Posted: 2019-10-21 22:59:14
www.npr.org
Doctor-patient interactions can make a big difference to the effectiveness of treatments. In a new study, even a fake pain treatment helped when doctors believed it was real.
Posted: 2019-10-21 20:09:57
www.npr.org
Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes
A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.
Posted: 2019-10-21 16:07:49
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Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk
Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the dementia.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
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Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
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Gifted Students With Autism Find An Intellectual Oasis In Iowa
A center at the University of Iowa is making sure that its programs for gifted teens include those with autism spectrum disorders.
Posted: 2019-10-16 09:05:00
www.npr.org
A Boy's Mysterious Illness Leads His Family On A Diagnostic Odyssey
Alex Yiu was born a healthy seeming baby. But by age 2, his muscle control and speech were deteriorating. His baffling condition took a decade to diagnose. The reanalysis of a DNA test was the...
Posted: 2019-10-14 19:54:53
www.npr.org
High School Vape Culture Can Be Almost As Hard To Shake As Addiction, Teens Say
One in 4 high school seniors say they have vaped in the past month. And for heavy users, scary headlines about serious illness and death are no match for nicotine addiction and peer pressure.
Posted: 2019-10-14 07:47:28
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Researchers Try A Genetic Diabetes Test To Prevent Emergency Hospitalizations
Will a genetic test for Type 1 diabetes risk be valuable to parents, despite its shortcomings? Now many parents don't know their kids have this condition until they end up in the hospital.

Posted: 2019-10-23 10:18:00
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Starting to vape is easy, but quitting a nicotine habit can be tough, teens are finding. Some vaping cessation programs have begun to reach out to teens where they live — on their phones.
Posted: 2019-10-23 09:00:24
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The technology behind e-cigarettes has changed over the years, and researchers are now finding evidence that the way different sorts of vaping devices and e-liquids interact could harm consumers.
Posted: 2019-10-22 23:06:33
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Research yet again shows teens are glued to their phones to an unhealthy degree. In fact, they may be choosing social media over sleep. But maybe it's not all sad face, researchers say.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
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Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-20 21:08:00
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Roundtable: Suicide Rates Rise Among Teens And Law Enforcement Officers
NPR's Michel Martin talks about the rising rates of suicide among teens and law enforcement officers with three experts: Sgt. Kevin Briggs, Jonathan Singer and Catherine Barber.
Posted: 2019-10-17 22:34:41
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Juul Suspends Sales of Flavored Vapes And Signs Settlement To Stop Marketing To Youth
Flavored e-cigarettes have hooked millions of teens to nicotine. Now, Juul says it will suspend sales of many flavors. Some call the move too little, too late.
Posted: 2019-10-17 16:38:50
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Childhood Obesity Is Rising "Shockingly Fast" — Even In Poor Countries
A comprehensive new report from UNICEF calls attention to the surge in obesity in developing countries — even as they're dealing with children who are undernourished.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
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Gifted Students With Autism Find An Intellectual Oasis In Iowa
A center at the University of Iowa is making sure that its programs for gifted teens include those with autism spectrum disorders.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
www.npr.org
Doctors Faced With Tough Decisions Due To Shortage Of Drug Used To Treat Cancer
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Yoram Unguru, a hematologist and oncologist in Baltimore, about a shortage of vincristine, a drug used to treat childhood cancer.
Posted: 2019-10-16 16:21:04
www.npr.org
Poor People Are Still Sicker Than The Rich In Germany, Despite Universal Health Care
Even with generous health coverage, sizable health disparities persist between Hamburg's wealthier and poorer neighborhoods. Crowding, poor air quality and fewer physicians plague poorer areas.