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Posted: 2019-08-20 21:09:00
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Jason DeParle's new book follows one Filipino family for over 30 years. He had originally intended to research slum life — but discovered that migration was what lifted the family out of the...
Posted: 2019-08-20 18:02:50
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In his new book, Gods of the Upper Air, Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas, Margaret Mead and the other 20th century anthropologists who challenged outdated notions of race, class and...
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:54:00
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"The big picture of survival is sometimes so hard to see, but we always know what we can do to make the next best step toward survival," says cave diver, photographer and memoirist Jill Heinerth.
Posted: 2019-08-18 11:55:11
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Poet Saida Dahir On 'The Walking Stereotype'
Eighteen-year-old Muslim Somali refugee Saida Dahir is an activist and hopes to inspire as a spoken word artist. Her debut poetry album is The Walking Stereotype. She talks with Lulu Garcia-Navarro.
Posted: 2019-08-17 12:00:38
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Bassey Ikpi On 'I'm Telling The Truth, But I'm Lying'
NPR's Scott Simon speaks with author and spoken-word artist Bassey Ikpi on her essays about growing up and dealing with mental illness.
Posted: 2019-08-15 18:25:29
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How Hannah Shaw, The 'Kitten Lady,' Rescues The Most Fragile Felines
The professional cat advocate and caretaker has penned a new guide, Tiny but Mighty, on how to adopt neonatal kittens, who are often too vulnerable to be housed in standard animal shelters.
Posted: 2019-08-14 09:03:00
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How Racism Has Evolved Over The Last 2 U.S. Presidencies
In the second of a two-part conversation, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Ibram X. Kendi about his latest book, How to Be an Antiracist.
Posted: 2019-08-14 09:00:56
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3 Afro Dominicana Writers Reflect On Their Truths
Music and identity dominates a wide-ranging conversation with writers Elizabeth Acevedo, Amanda Alcantara and Danyeli Rodriguez del Orbe.
Posted: 2019-08-13 20:47:00
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Ibram X. Kendi: 'Racism Isn't An Identity, It's What You're Doing In The Moment'
Writer Ibram X. Kendi's new book tackles one of today's most important topics. How To Be an Antiracist lays out his definition of what makes a racist — and what people can do to combat racism.
Posted: 2019-08-13 17:44:00
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'Kochland': How The Koch Brothers Changed U.S. Corporate And Political Power
In a new book, Christopher Leonard chronicles how Koch Industries acquired huge businesses, limited its liability and created a political influence network to remake the GOP.

Posted: 2019-08-19 16:54:00
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"The big picture of survival is sometimes so hard to see, but we always know what we can do to make the next best step toward survival," says cave diver, photographer and memoirist Jill Heinerth.
Posted: 2019-08-19 11:00:55
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Dining out can be fraught with hidden perils for people with food allergies. European allergen disclosure laws have made restaurants highly aware of the issue. But U.S. rules lag.
Posted: 2019-08-13 19:21:10
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Officials in the New Jersey city began to hand out water bottles this week after the Environmental Protection Agency said filtered drinking water samples exceeded government thresholds on lead...
Posted: 2019-08-05 11:00:20
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Let's Drink To Your Health? Alcohol Producers Tout Wellness Benefits
As millennials continue to fuel the decline in wine sales, some alcohol brands are making health claims as a way to attract consumers. But this has scientists and wellness experts on edge.
Posted: 2019-08-02 15:18:30
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Sesame Allergies Are Likely More Widespread Than Previously Thought
New research suggests allergies to sesame are comparably prevalent as those to some tree nuts. The findings come as the FDA weighs whether to require sesame to be listed as an allergen on food...
Posted: 2019-07-22 09:01:00
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2 Nurses In Tennessee Preach 'Diabetes Reversal'
Patients with Type 2 diabetes are often steered toward medicine or insulin to control blood sugar. But it's also possible, with more support than patients often get, to use diet and exercise...
Posted: 2019-07-17 22:30:59
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If We All Ate Enough Fruits And Vegetables, There'd Be Big Shortages
There's already not enough produce for everyone in the world to get the daily recommended amount. Two new studies urge revamping the food system to feed the growing population and protect the...
Posted: 2019-07-14 11:00:32
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Mixing Alcohol And Sun? Beware, A Buzz Begets A Faster Burn
Drinking alcohol is linked to an increased risk of skin cancer. Part of the risk may be explained by the direct effect that alcohol has on antioxidant levels in the skin, which can hasten a sunburn.
Posted: 2019-07-11 22:49:30
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Cutting Just 300 Calories Per Day May Keep Your Heart Healthy
That's the equivalent of about six standard Oreos. But this modest reduction in calories could have protective benefits for our hearts, a new study finds.
Posted: 2019-07-07 11:00:52
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How Hydroponic School Gardens Can Cultivate Food Justice, Year-Round
In neighborhoods with limited access to healthy foods, school gardens can help close the gap — for students and the wider community. Some schools are now expanding the season by growing indoors.

Posted: 2019-08-22 18:34:56
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Washington Post journalist Scott Higham says recently released evidence shows the drug industry purposely shipped big quantities of opioids to communities without regard for how they were being...
Posted: 2019-08-22 17:23:59
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Scientists around the world are working to correct a problem with genetic health information — too much of it is currently based on samples of Europeans.
Posted: 2019-08-22 09:04:00
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NPR visited the only lab in the world known to be trying to use the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR to modify the DNA in human sperm. If successful, it could be used to prevent genetic disorders.
Posted: 2019-08-22 09:00:00
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Addiction Clinics Market Unproven Infusion Treatments To Desperate Patients
Some addiction treatment clinics offer IV infusions of a mix of supplements — including something known as NAD. The treatment isn't proven to work and is not FDA-approved for addiction.
Posted: 2019-08-21 18:03:20
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Poll: Nearly 1 in 5 Americans Says Pain Often Interferes With Daily Life
How do Americans experience and cope with pain that makes everyday life harder? We asked in the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll.
Posted: 2019-08-21 17:23:48
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Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People
A detailed comparison of mouse and human brain tissue found differences that could help explain why mice aren't always a good model for human diseases.
Posted: 2019-08-20 15:04:20
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Restrictions On Abortion Medication Deserve A Second Look, Says A Former FDA Head
The FDA heavily restricted mifepristone — a drug that ends early pregnancies — when it approved it 19 years ago. A former FDA commissioner asks whether the current restrictions should be...
Posted: 2019-08-19 09:04:52
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Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.
Posted: 2019-08-18 11:55:11
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This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives
The startup Mahmee hopes to help OB-GYNs, pediatricians and other health providers closely monitor a mother and baby's health so that any red flags can be assessed before they become life-threatening.
Posted: 2019-08-15 20:22:00
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These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail
No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and might make a soldier's heavy loads easier to carry.

Posted: 2019-08-21 18:03:20
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How do Americans experience and cope with pain that makes everyday life harder? We asked in the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll.
Posted: 2019-08-21 16:17:54
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Tell us about how you decided it was the right time to quit, what your strategy was, and what you learned that could be useful to other people trying to ditch the habit.
Posted: 2019-08-20 19:39:43
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Scientists are getting closer to developing a wearable patch that can measure hydration and other health markers — in sweat. The hope is it could give athletes more data to boost their performance.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:00:07
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Cigarettes Can't Be Advertised On TV. Should Juul Ads Be Permitted?
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:19:26
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Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?
A Canadian study suggests that fluoride consumed by pregnant women can affect the IQ of their children. No single study provides definitive answers, but the findings will no doubt stir debate.
Posted: 2019-08-19 09:04:52
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Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.
Posted: 2019-08-16 21:27:00
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What's Behind A Cluster Of Vaping-Related Hospitalizations?
Dozens of people in the Midwest have been hospitalized with severe lung damage in the past month. It's unclear what exactly is causing the issue but the common link appears to be vaping.
Posted: 2019-08-16 12:00:26
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Fresh Starts, Guilty Pleasures And Other Pro Tips For Sticking To Good Habits
For most of us, sticking to a good habit is a battle of will. But the researchers who study habit formation turn to science to help curtail their own tendency to slack off.
Posted: 2019-08-15 15:06:38
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Do You Need All Those Meds? How To Talk To Your Doctor About Cutting Back
Drug combinations can cause side effects like confusion and dizziness — and even increase the risk for falls. Here's how to talk to your doctor about reducing or eliminating some prescriptions.
Posted: 2019-08-13 18:33:00
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Air Pollution May Be As Harmful To Your Lungs As Smoking Cigarettes, Study Finds
Smog can spike during hot days. A new study finds that the effects of breathing air pollution may be cumulative. Long-term exposure may lead to lung disease, even among people who've never smoked.

Posted: 2019-08-22 17:36:01
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Mayors from 70 American cities send a letter to the Trump administration, saying a plan to push millions of people out of the federal food stamp program would punish some of the country's neediest.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:00:07
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Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-19 21:50:00
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NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford, who specializes in obesity medicine, about a new app from WW — formerly Weight Watchers — that targets children.
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:19:26
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Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?
A Canadian study suggests that fluoride consumed by pregnant women can affect the IQ of their children. No single study provides definitive answers, but the findings will no doubt stir debate.
Posted: 2019-08-18 11:55:11
www.npr.org
This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives
The startup Mahmee hopes to help OB-GYNs, pediatricians and other health providers closely monitor a mother and baby's health so that any red flags can be assessed before they become life-threatening.
Posted: 2019-08-17 12:00:38
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Netflix Curbs Tobacco Use Onscreen, But Not Pot. What's Up With That?
TV networks have standards that minimize tobacco use on shows, and Netflix now does, too. But streaming companies lack public policies about smoking cannabis onscreen, and doctors say that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-16 21:27:00
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What's Behind A Cluster Of Vaping-Related Hospitalizations?
Dozens of people in the Midwest have been hospitalized with severe lung damage in the past month. It's unclear what exactly is causing the issue but the common link appears to be vaping.
Posted: 2019-08-15 04:06:00
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Most Kids On Medicaid Who Are Prescribed ADHD Drugs Don't Get Proper Follow-Up
An inspector general report from the Department of Health and Human Services found that 100,000 kids who were newly prescribed ADHD medication didn't see a care provider for months afterward.
Posted: 2019-08-10 12:34:53
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At 'High Five' Camp, Struggling With A Disability Is The Point
A day camp in Nashville uses "constraint-induced therapy" to help kids who have physical weakness on one side — often because of a stroke or cerebral palsy — gain strength and independence.
Posted: 2019-08-09 21:44:00
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American With No Medical Training Ran Center For Malnourished Ugandan Kids. 105 Died
When she was 19, Renee Bach founded a charity that went on to care for over 900 severely malnourished babies and children, Now she is being sued by two of the mothers whose children died.