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Posted: 2019-06-23 12:17:50
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The author says writing this novel was like writing an "anti-murder mystery." Murder mysteries are nice and tidy, she says, but this disturbing morality tale is about unforeseeable tragedy.
Posted: 2019-06-23 00:11:42
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Nicole Weisensee Egan has followed the sexual assault accusations against Bill Cosby since 2005. At first a skeptic herself, Egan discusses how "America's Dad" managed to escape justice for decades.
Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:38
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The debut novel from NPR's own Linda Holmes follows a suddenly widowed (and not all that grief-stricken) woman and her new lodger — a former major league ballplayer who's lost his ability to...
Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:38
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Chanelle Benz On 'The Gone Dead'
Chanelle Benz's new novel is a story that swells with Mississippi swelter, blood oaths, old grudges, conspiracy theories and everlasting mysteries. Scott Simon talks with her about the book.
Posted: 2019-06-21 20:25:00
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'Damaged' Tales Of Love, In Fiction From 'BoJack' Creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg
The writer, better known for his dark animated comedy about a has-been horse, has written a collection of surreal short stories called Someone Who Will Love You in All Your Damaged Glory.
Posted: 2019-06-21 12:59:06
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Nora McInerny: What Does Moving Forward Look Like After Loss?
In 2014, Nora McInerny experienced a wave of loss that reshaped her whole life. Despite the painful memories from that year, she explains why she doesn't want to "move on" from her grief.
Posted: 2019-06-19 20:39:33
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Robert Menasse Looks At The People Who Make the European Union Run In 'The Capital'
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Austrian novelist Robert Menasse about his new book, an absurdist comic tragedy called The Capital, for which he embedded with European Union civil servants in...
Posted: 2019-06-18 18:34:45
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Uncovering The Story Of Cyclist Major Taylor, America's 1st Black Sports Star
At the height of America's Jim Crow era, Taylor broke barriers by becoming the country's fastest and most famous cyclist. Michael Kranish tells his story in the new book, The World's Fastest...
Posted: 2019-06-17 17:50:00
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A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Can Help
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, Elderhood.
Posted: 2019-06-17 09:02:00
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'Patron Saints Of Nothing' Is A Book For 'The Hyphenated'
Young adult author Randy Ribay says it's tough having "a dual identity" in a world "where people want you to be one thing." His new novel explores the Philippine government's deadly war on drugs.

Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
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This roasted barley flour has been a Tibetan staple for centuries. When China annexed Tibet in the 1950s, tsampa became a rallying point for the resistance. But will it catch on in America?
Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
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Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your...
Posted: 2019-06-12 22:31:10
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A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those...
Posted: 2019-06-12 09:02:00
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Why Food Reformers Have Mixed Feelings About Eco-Labels
Grocery stores are full of food with labels like organic, cage-free or fair trade that appeal to a consumer's ideals. But there's often a gap between what they seem to promise and what they deliver.
Posted: 2019-06-04 22:04:19
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How A Fight Over Beef Jerky Reveals Tensions Over SNAP In The Trump Era
Retailers that accept SNAP benefits must stock a variety of staple foods, including a minimum number of fruits and vegetables, meat, dairy and grain options. Now there's a fight over what counts.
Posted: 2019-05-29 18:09:00
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10,000 Steps A Day? How Many You Really Need To Boost Longevity
Walking every day has been shown again and again to be important for staying healthy as you age. But how much do you need to walk to promote a long life?
Posted: 2019-05-24 11:00:40
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Opinion: Why Ditching Processed Foods Won't Be Easy — Barriers To Cooking From Scratch
Though a new study shows that eating unprocessed food is healthier, home-cooked meals require resources that food experts take for granted, such as money and time, the authors of a new book argue.
Posted: 2019-05-23 17:00:00
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To Reduce Food Waste, FDA Urges 'Best If Used By' Date Labels
Confusion over whether a food is still safe to eat after its "sell by" or "use before" date accounts for about 20% of food waste in U.S. homes, the FDA says. The new wording aims to clear that...
Posted: 2019-05-18 11:00:51
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Calories, Carbs, Fat, Fiber: Unraveling The Links Between Breast Cancer And Diet
A new study finds that women who ate a low-fat diet and more fruits, vegetables and grains, lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer. But which of those factors provided the protective...
Posted: 2019-05-16 15:00:00
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It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain
"Landmark" study finds a highly processed diet spurred people to overeat compared with an unprocessed diet, about 500 extra calories a day. That suggests something about processing itself is...

Posted: 2019-06-23 15:56:00
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Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and recovery time is shorter. Those are a few reasons why more medical schools are training students how to be better robotic surgeons.
Posted: 2019-06-23 12:17:50
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Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and recovery time is shorter. Those are a few reasons why more medical schools are training students how to be better robotic surgeons.
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:00
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A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:57:00
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Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot
As more states legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana, veterinarians are treating more intoxicated dogs who've gotten into THC edibles, discarded joints or drug-laced feces.
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:55:40
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When There's No Doctor Nearby, Volunteers Help Rural Patients Manage Chronic Illness
Many rural people live too far from a doctor to visit one regularly. In Wyoming, volunteers offer health skills trainings to help patients stay on top of chronic conditions.
Posted: 2019-06-19 16:16:36
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When Surgeons Are Abrasive To Coworkers, Patients' Health May Suffer
A new study shows a link between how surgeons act around coworkers and their patients' outcomes. Turns out rudeness and other unprofessional behavior isn't just obnoxious, it may be dangerous.
Posted: 2019-06-18 19:44:41
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Florida Wants To Import Medicine From Canada. But How Would That Work?
A bill Gov. Ron DeSantis signed this month would let Florida make bulk purchases of prescription drugs from Canada. It's now law, but still faces big hurdles that could keep it from becoming...
Posted: 2019-06-17 17:50:00
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A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Can Help
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, Elderhood.
Posted: 2019-06-17 09:02:00
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A Year After Spinal Surgery, A $94,000 Bill Feels Like A Backbreaker
A service called neuromonitoring can cut the risk of nerve damage during delicate surgery. But some patients are receiving large bills they didn't expect.
Posted: 2019-06-14 21:22:22
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Be Careful Of Fecal Transplants, Warns FDA, After Patient Death
The FDA has strengthened oversight of experimental fecal transplants after a patient died of an infection. The donor's stool contained disease-causing pathogens, but was not tested before use.

Posted: 2019-06-24 09:01:00
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Many events in our adult lives involve drinking alcohol such as weddings, funerals and office parties. But a new movement is making living sober look glamorous.
Posted: 2019-06-24 09:01:00
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The sober curious movement — people who are limiting their alcohol consumption — is relatively new. Early research suggests that even taking a short break from booze is good for your health.
Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
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Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your...
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:57:00
www.npr.org
Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot
As more states legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana, veterinarians are treating more intoxicated dogs who've gotten into THC edibles, discarded joints or drug-laced feces.
Posted: 2019-06-17 09:02:00
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A Year After Spinal Surgery, A $94,000 Bill Feels Like A Backbreaker
A service called neuromonitoring can cut the risk of nerve damage during delicate surgery. But some patients are receiving large bills they didn't expect.
Posted: 2019-06-11 16:14:00
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Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says people at high risk of being infected with HIV should be offered a daily pill containing antiretroviral medications. The drug's cost remains a hurdle.
Posted: 2019-06-10 20:38:00
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A Musical Brain May Help Us Understand Language And Appreciate Tchaikovsky
Compared with monkeys, humans have a brain that is extremely sensitive to a sound's pitch. And that may reflect our exposure to speech and music.
Posted: 2019-06-10 09:00:00
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Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?
Changing how the mind reacts to pain can reduce the discomfort experienced, according to scientists who study brain pathways that regulate pain. A new type of therapy aims to enhance that effect.
Posted: 2019-06-06 19:50:29
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Social Security Error Jeopardizes Medicare Coverage For 250,000 Seniors
A billing glitch could cause lapses in private drug policies and Medicare Advantage plans that provide both medical and drug coverage. Premiums weren't deducted from some Social Security checks.
Posted: 2019-06-06 18:19:00
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Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies
It turns out you aren't simply a clone of cells from the womb. Over a lifetime, mutations create a patchwork of tissues made with pieces that have subtly different genetic signatures.

Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:00
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NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the unsanitary conditions for detained migrant children in border detention facilities.
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:00
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A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.
Posted: 2019-06-12 15:50:00
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Having to come up with $1,000 unexpectedly can be a challenge for anyone. NPR's recent poll on rural health found that especially true for one group: people with disabilities.
Posted: 2019-06-06 19:04:09
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Could Antibiotics Be A Silver Bullet For Kids In Africa?
A study from Niger reveals a dramatic drop in mortality among children given a twice-yearly dose of azithromycin. Yet concern remains about the potential impact on antibiotic resistance.
Posted: 2019-06-05 09:00:00
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How Doctors Can Stop Stigmatizing — And Start Helping — Kids With Obesity
Physicians often harbor unconscious bias against kids and teens with obesity. It affects how they talk with their patients and can make kids' health worse. Some doctors are trying a new approach.
Posted: 2019-06-04 20:38:00
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House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies
A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering using gene-edited embryos to establish pregnancies.
Posted: 2019-06-03 20:19:04
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How To Do Brain Surgery In A War Zone
Dr. Omar Ibrahim is a neurosurgeon at the only working hospital in Syria's south Idlib province. The staff, he told NPR via Skype, has "just moved into the basement [because of] the attacks."
Posted: 2019-06-03 15:49:00
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2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death
Analysis of DNA from more than 400,000 people in the U.K. suggests a genetic modification that protects against HIV may actually increase the overall risk of premature death.
Posted: 2019-05-31 11:13:00
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It Looked As Though Millions Of Babies Would Miss Out On A Lifesaving Vaccine
Last fall, Merck said it would stop selling its rotavirus vaccine to West Africa and redirect its supply to China at a higher price. After NPR broke the story, the situation changed — for the...
Posted: 2019-05-31 09:01:00
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News Brief: Tariffs On Mexico, Missouri Clinic, Rotavirus Vaccine
Trump announces a 5% tax on all goods from Mexico. Missouri may soon be without a clinic that provides abortions. And, which companies stepped up to supply the rotavirus vaccine in West Africa.