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Posted: 2018-12-13 19:22:06
www.sciencedaily.com
Researchers have found a bacteria-killing virus that can listen in on bacterial conversations -- and then they made it attack diseases including salmonella, E. coli and cholera.
Posted: 2018-12-13 13:36:39
www.sciencedaily.com
Researchers have designed an ingestible capsule that can be controlled using Bluetooth wireless technology. Their capsule, which can be customized to deliver drugs, sense environmental conditions,...
Posted: 2018-12-13 13:36:28
www.sciencedaily.com
What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes -- while significantly reducing your electric bill and carbon footprint?...
Posted: 2018-12-12 18:44:35
www.sciencedaily.com
First sensor package that can ride aboard bees
Farmers can already use drones to soar over huge fields and monitor temperature, humidity or crop health. But these machines need so much power to fly that they can't get very far without needing...
Posted: 2018-12-12 15:46:39
www.sciencedaily.com
Deep-learning technique reveals 'invisible' objects in the dark
Small imperfections in a wine glass or tiny creases in a contact lens can be tricky to make out, even in good light. In almost total darkness, images of such transparent features or objects are...
Posted: 2018-12-12 15:46:32
www.sciencedaily.com
Fighting obesity: Could it be as plain as dirt?
It costs the global economy an estimated US $2 trillion annually and has been dubbed a modern day health epidemic, but new research has unearthed a possible cure for obesity -- and it is as plain...
Posted: 2018-12-12 14:33:08
www.sciencedaily.com
How plants can generate electricity to power LED light bulbs
Researchers have discovered that living plants are literally 'green' power source: they can generate, by a single leaf, more than 150 Volts, enough to simultaneously power 100 LED light bulbs....
Posted: 2018-12-12 00:21:43
www.sciencedaily.com
Dracula ants possess fastest known animal appendage: The snap-jaw
Move over, trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimp: There's a faster appendage in town. According to a new study, the Dracula ant, Mystrium camillae, can snap its mandibles at speeds of up to 90 meters...
Posted: 2018-12-12 00:00:18
www.sciencedaily.com
New models sense human trust in smart machines
New 'classification models' sense how well humans trust intelligent machines they collaborate with, a step toward improving the quality of interactions and teamwork.
Posted: 2018-12-10 20:06:22
www.sciencedaily.com
Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively
The human brain needs to suppress obvious ideas in order to reach the most creative ones, according to scientists. These obvious associations are present in both convergent thinking (finding...