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Posted: 2019-12-05 22:02:05
www.npr.org
Three of the 12 women enrolled in a study of progesterone to reverse a medication-based abortion required ambulance transport to a hospital for treatment of severe vaginal bleeding.
Posted: 2019-12-05 16:00:55
www.npr.org
They've identified hundreds of proteins in human blood that wax and wane in surprising ways as we age. The findings could provide important clues about which substances in the blood can slow...
Posted: 2019-12-05 10:00:02
www.npr.org
Weary of losing neighbors and patients to gunfire, St. Louis trauma surgeon Laurie Punch has a message: Gun violence is contagious, but so is healing. Doctors who teach can be part of the solution.
Posted: 2019-12-04 17:13:44
www.npr.org
HIV Prevention Drugs Are Available For Free: How Do You Get Them?
For people at high risk of HIV, taking a daily dose of a prevention drug is essential. But many can't afford it. A new federal program makes the drugs available for free.
Posted: 2019-12-04 10:23:00
www.npr.org
For HIV-Positive Babies, New Evidence Favors Starting Drug Treatment Just After Birth
Doctors used to worry that antiretroviral drugs were too powerful for HIV-positive newborns. More evidence is emerging that, in fact, early treatment can be safe and effective.
Posted: 2019-12-04 10:00:31
www.npr.org
Brunch, Margaritas And Good Advice: How Peer Support Helps Those Living With HIV
Thrive SS, an HIV support program by and for black men, credits its popularity to its grassroots approach. But the model, which focuses on forming a social networks, misses out on federal funding.
Posted: 2019-12-03 20:12:00
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After A Freak Accident, A Doctor Finds Insight Into 'Living Life And Facing Death'
In 1990, BJ Miller was electrocuted by a train. That accident during college took most of his limbs, but the event and his recovery inspired him to pursue a career as a palliative care physician.
Posted: 2019-11-30 12:00:18
www.npr.org
Opinion: Emergency Rooms Shouldn't Be Parking Lots For Patients
Patients in hospital ERs can wait hours for inpatient beds to open up. The delays can be maddening. A solution for this long-standing problem has been elusive in the U.S., despite progress elsewhere.
Posted: 2019-11-29 21:24:00
www.npr.org
When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help
Most people think domestic violence involves an adult abusing an intimate partner or a child, but children can also threaten, bully and attack family members. Some abused parents are speaking...
Posted: 2019-11-26 18:20:48
www.npr.org
Nothing To Sneeze At: $2,659 Bill To Pluck Doll's Shoe From Girl's Nose
A young girl put matching doll shoes up her nose. One came out easily. The second required a trip to the hospital emergency department and led to a bill that isn't child's play.

Posted: 2019-12-05 22:02:05
www.npr.org
Three of the 12 women enrolled in a study of progesterone to reverse a medication-based abortion required ambulance transport to a hospital for treatment of severe vaginal bleeding.
Posted: 2019-12-04 22:59:07
www.npr.org
Many women get their hair dyed or straightened regularly with products that contain thousands of chemicals. Researchers are teasing out whether our hair habits could be raising our breast cancer...
Posted: 2019-11-29 10:00:00
www.npr.org
After they give birth, black women are more likely than other women to suffer from postpartum depression. But many can't get treatment — or they avoid it because they fear government scrutiny.
Posted: 2019-11-28 10:00:30
www.npr.org
Here's To Grown-Up Siblings And The Ties That Bind
Though she and her younger brother are very different, he's the one, in a way, she knows best. Sibling relationships, in fact, are the longest-lasting family ties we have, transcending time and...
Posted: 2019-11-26 18:20:48
www.npr.org
Nothing To Sneeze At: $2,659 Bill To Pluck Doll's Shoe From Girl's Nose
A young girl put matching doll shoes up her nose. One came out easily. The second required a trip to the hospital emergency department and led to a bill that isn't child's play.
Posted: 2019-11-25 10:11:00
www.npr.org
For Your Heart, Eat Fish Or Take Pills? Now There's A Drug Equal To 8 Salmon Servings
A high-dose prescription fish oil pill has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. An FDA advisory panel voted in favor of expanded use of the drug.
Posted: 2019-11-24 12:00:00
www.npr.org
Excess Weight Can Weaken The Flu Shot
Scientists have come to realize that flu vaccines are less effective for people who are overweight or obese. Now researchers are trying to figure out why and hope to develop better vaccines.
Posted: 2019-11-21 21:34:00
www.npr.org
'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick
The story of the first worker in the U.S. to suffer lung damage after cutting a new kind of countertop material shows the way a workplace hazard emerged in this country.
Posted: 2019-11-20 21:09:00
www.npr.org
The Loudness Of Vowels Helps The Brain Break Down Speech Into Syl-La-Bles
Syllables are the building blocks of spoken language. And now a study of brain activity hints at how we extract them from a stream of speech.
Posted: 2019-11-19 12:01:00
www.npr.org
Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease
Researchers edited the DNA in bone marrow cells taken from a Mississippi woman with sickle cell disease to produce a treatment that could alleviate the excruciating effects of her inherited illness.

Posted: 2019-12-05 22:37:16
www.npr.org
The World Health Organization has released the latest data on measles. The increase in cases is notable — and a sign of how much work needs to be done to address the outbreak.
Posted: 2019-12-05 10:00:02
www.npr.org
Weary of losing neighbors and patients to gunfire, St. Louis trauma surgeon Laurie Punch has a message: Gun violence is contagious, but so is healing. Doctors who teach can be part of the solution.
Posted: 2019-12-04 10:23:00
www.npr.org
Doctors used to worry that antiretroviral drugs were too powerful for HIV-positive newborns. More evidence is emerging that, in fact, early treatment can be safe and effective.
Posted: 2019-12-02 21:32:00
www.npr.org
Samoan Government To Close Its Offices Amid Measles Crisis That Has Left 53 Dead
Forty-eight of the fatalities were children under 4 years old. The number of immunizations plummeted last year after improperly prepared vaccines led to the deaths of two infants.
Posted: 2019-11-29 21:24:00
www.npr.org
When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help
Most people think domestic violence involves an adult abusing an intimate partner or a child, but children can also threaten, bully and attack family members. Some abused parents are speaking...
Posted: 2019-11-28 12:17:00
www.npr.org
Study: For HIV-Infected Babies, Treatment Should Start At Birth
Every day, as many as 500 babies in sub-Saharan Africa are born with HIV. A study out of Botswana finds that if newborns are given treatment right away, the virus becomes almost undetectable.
Posted: 2019-11-27 12:39:18
www.npr.org
Active Shooter Drills May Not Stop A School Shooting — But This Method Could
Active shooter drills are one way schools prepare for possible shootings. Now a new report underlines a method for prevention: threat assessment, along with social and emotional support for students.
Posted: 2019-11-26 18:20:48
www.npr.org
Nothing To Sneeze At: $2,659 Bill To Pluck Doll's Shoe From Girl's Nose
A young girl put matching doll shoes up her nose. One came out easily. The second required a trip to the hospital emergency department and led to a bill that isn't child's play.
Posted: 2019-11-22 22:19:54
www.npr.org
In The Fight For Money For The Opioid Crisis, Will The Youngest Victims Be Left Out?
The opioid epidemic is intergenerational, with tens of thousands of babies born every year dependent on opioids. Advocates worry lawsuits against the drug industry might overlook these children.
Posted: 2019-11-20 10:00:00
www.npr.org
America's 'Shame': Medicaid Funding Slashed In U.S. Territories
Five U.S. territories say if Congress doesn't quickly allocate more funding for their Medicaid programs, they will be forced to make brutal triage decisions that will likely cost American lives.

Posted: 2019-12-05 10:00:02
www.npr.org
Weary of losing neighbors and patients to gunfire, St. Louis trauma surgeon Laurie Punch has a message: Gun violence is contagious, but so is healing. Doctors who teach can be part of the solution.
Posted: 2019-12-03 10:00:28
www.npr.org
Fans of Medicare for All are betting that most Democrats who vote have moved left since 2008, at least on health care. But results from a mix of recent polls suggest voters' views aren't clear-cut.
Posted: 2019-11-29 10:00:00
www.npr.org
After they give birth, black women are more likely than other women to suffer from postpartum depression. But many can't get treatment — or they avoid it because they fear government scrutiny.
Posted: 2019-11-28 10:00:30
www.npr.org
Here's To Grown-Up Siblings And The Ties That Bind
Though she and her younger brother are very different, he's the one, in a way, she knows best. Sibling relationships, in fact, are the longest-lasting family ties we have, transcending time and...
Posted: 2019-11-27 12:39:18
www.npr.org
Active Shooter Drills May Not Stop A School Shooting — But This Method Could
Active shooter drills are one way schools prepare for possible shootings. Now a new report underlines a method for prevention: threat assessment, along with social and emotional support for students.
Posted: 2019-11-22 22:19:54
www.npr.org
In The Fight For Money For The Opioid Crisis, Will The Youngest Victims Be Left Out?
The opioid epidemic is intergenerational, with tens of thousands of babies born every year dependent on opioids. Advocates worry lawsuits against the drug industry might overlook these children.
Posted: 2019-11-22 00:59:00
www.npr.org
They Bring Medical Care To The Homeless And Build Relationships To Save Lives
"Street medicine" programs, like one in Atlanta, seek out people living in back alleys and under highways. The public health outreach improves patients' health and is cost-effective, hospitals...
Posted: 2019-11-21 10:00:19
www.npr.org
2020 Affordable Care Act Health Plans: What's New
ACA plans for 2020 are cheaper than last year — premiums lower, on average. And in some areas, people who qualify for federal subsidies could end up with no monthly payment. But read the fine...
Posted: 2019-11-18 23:07:09
www.npr.org
How 1 Study Changed The Field Of Psychiatry Forever
NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Susannah Cahalan about her new book, The Great Pretender, which tells the story of a landmark study that transformed the field of mental health.
Posted: 2019-11-18 21:58:00
www.npr.org
Oregon Law Meant To Help Mentally Ill Has Ended Up Putting More Of Them On The Street
Oregon's new law designed to direct suspects with a mental illness to a state hospital is leaving some behind. Those charged with misdemeanors don't always qualify. That's raised some alarms.

Posted: 2019-12-05 16:00:55
www.npr.org
They've identified hundreds of proteins in human blood that wax and wane in surprising ways as we age. The findings could provide important clues about which substances in the blood can slow...
Posted: 2019-12-03 20:12:00
www.npr.org
In 1990, BJ Miller was electrocuted by a train. That accident during college took most of his limbs, but the event and his recovery inspired him to pursue a career as a palliative care physician.
Posted: 2019-12-03 10:00:28
www.npr.org
Fans of Medicare for All are betting that most Democrats who vote have moved left since 2008, at least on health care. But results from a mix of recent polls suggest voters' views aren't clear-cut.
Posted: 2019-11-30 13:42:00
www.npr.org
The White House Says Nursing Home Regulations Are Too Tough
The Trump administration wants to reduce the "burden" on nursing home operators by relaxing rules governing the facilities. Critics see troubling implications for the care of millions of residents.
Posted: 2019-11-20 10:00:00
www.npr.org
America's 'Shame': Medicaid Funding Slashed In U.S. Territories
Five U.S. territories say if Congress doesn't quickly allocate more funding for their Medicaid programs, they will be forced to make brutal triage decisions that will likely cost American lives.
Posted: 2019-11-15 10:00:22
www.npr.org
Why Even Universal Health Coverage Isn't Enough
As U.S. presidential candidates prep for their next debate, a doctor-to-be asks them, and us all, to remember that even universal access to health care won't fix other disparities that hurt health.
Posted: 2019-11-11 10:05:00
www.npr.org
Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%
For some patients in pain, opioids are still part of the long-term solution, doctors say. But by adding meditation, hypnosis or other treatments, the opioid dose can be reduced.
Posted: 2019-11-01 14:26:00
www.npr.org
California's Preemptive Blackouts Put A Strain On People With Home Medical Needs
People who rely on plug-in health devices or medicine that requires refrigeration are scrambling to find ways to avoid potentially life-threatening disruptions now and in future fire season shutdowns.
Posted: 2019-11-01 09:00:21
www.npr.org
Return To Sender? Just One Missed Letter Can Be Enough To End Medicaid Benefits
Colorado, like a number of states, is struggling with huge piles of returned mail linked to public aid programs such as Medicaid or food stamps. But is dropping people from such assistance the...
Posted: 2019-10-31 19:21:43
www.npr.org
How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins
A study of 11 sleeping brains sheds some light on the mysterious link between sleep problems and Alzheimer's disease. The flow of cerebrospinal fluid through the brain appears to be the key.