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Posted: 2020-01-22 10:00:09
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A study this month showed giving extra social services to the neediest patients didn't reduce hospital readmissions. Now health advocates say that might not be the right measurement of success.
Posted: 2020-01-21 18:01:00
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The U. S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to be told about funding decisions for lab research that could make risky viruses even worse.
Posted: 2020-01-21 10:06:30
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The for-profit hospice industry has grown, allowing more Americans to die at home. But few family members realize that "hospice care" still means they'll do most of the physical and emotional...
Posted: 2020-01-21 10:00:28
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Roe v. Wade: Settled Law Or Bad Precedent? States Prep For An Overturn
A Supreme Court case in March will test the new five-member conservative majority. If justices strike federal abortion protections, look for a state-by-state quilt of abortion "deserts" and "havens."
Posted: 2020-01-20 14:00:20
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Patients Still Struggle To Balance High Costs Of MS Treatment, Despite Generic
Drugs to treat multiple sclerosis can run $70,000 a year or more. Patients hoped competition from a generic version of one of the most popular brands would spur relief, but prices went up. Here's...
Posted: 2020-01-18 12:55:09
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Assessing The Injuries After Iranian Missile Attack
Eleven U.S. service members have been sent to hospitals abroad after suffering injuries in Iran's missile strike in Iraq. Scott Simon speaks to neuropsychiatrist Stephen Xenakis about what that...
Posted: 2020-01-16 17:14:00
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Sepsis Kills Millions More Worldwide Than Previously Estimated
Sepsis, or blood poisoning, arises when the body overreacts to an infection. An analysis finds that it may be involved in 20% of deaths worldwide, twice the proportion previously estimated.
Posted: 2020-01-16 10:06:10
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Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth
Forty mice spent more than a month in orbit to test two approaches to strengthening muscle and bone in microgravity conditions. The results could help people with muscle and bone diseases.
Posted: 2020-01-15 21:18:00
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Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns
Aiming to find a cheaper, easier way than IVF to ensure human embryos are healthy before implantation, researchers paid women to be inseminated, then flushed the embryos from their wombs for...
Posted: 2020-01-14 16:03:09
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FDA Approves Drugs Faster Than Ever, But Relies On Weaker Evidence, Researchers Find
Changes in the way the Food and Drug Administration reviews new medicines mean that there are more cures and treatments on the market. But there's also less proof the drugs are safe and effective.

Posted: 2020-01-16 17:14:00
www.npr.org
Sepsis, or blood poisoning, arises when the body overreacts to an infection. An analysis finds that it may be involved in 20% of deaths worldwide, twice the proportion previously estimated.
Posted: 2020-01-16 10:06:10
www.npr.org
Women with a history of depression and anxiety are at a higher risk of having a flair up during the time leading up to menopause. And getting doctors to take the issue seriously can be challenging.
Posted: 2020-01-15 10:03:13
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Nearly 1 in 7 women suffers from depression during pregnancy or postpartum. But very few get treatment. Doctors in Massachusetts have a new way to get them help.
Posted: 2020-01-13 10:04:01
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The Kratom Debate: Helpful Herb Or Dangerous Drug?
Some people struggling with opioid addiction who switched to kratom swear the herb salvaged their lives. But federal agencies and the brother of a man who died from his kratom use warn of its...
Posted: 2020-01-12 12:00:49
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Ready For Your First Marathon? Training Can Cut Years Off Your Cardiovascular Age
More reasons to commit to a race: A new study shows that novice runners who take on a marathon significantly improved their heart health. We've got tips to get you started.
Posted: 2020-01-11 12:00:41
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Feeling Artsy? Here's How Making Art Helps Your Brain
Making art is fun. But there's a lot more to it. It might serve an evolutionary purpose — and emerging research shows that it can help us process difficult emotions and tap into joy.
Posted: 2020-01-08 12:00:59
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Progress On Lung Cancer Drives Historic Drop In U.S. Cancer Death Rate
The U.S. cancer death rate dropped more than 2% between 2016 and 2017, the biggest single-year drop ever, according to the American Cancer Society. Better treatment for lung cancer is a factor.
Posted: 2020-01-04 12:00:50
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Hope, Happiness, And Social Connection: Hidden Benefits Of Regular Exercise
A new book, The Joy of Movement, offers more motivation to exercise. It's not just about getting fit or looking good: Exercise can give you courage, pleasure, and better friendships.
Posted: 2020-01-01 12:00:53
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For Healthy New Year's Habits, Learn From The World's Longest-Lived Peoples
A doctor's best advice for how to prevent illness: Keep it simple, and emulate the lifestyles of the healthiest people in the world.
Posted: 2019-12-31 15:26:10
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Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

Posted: 2020-01-15 21:18:00
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Aiming to find a cheaper, easier way than IVF to ensure human embryos are healthy before implantation, researchers paid women to be inseminated, then flushed the embryos from their wombs for...
Posted: 2020-01-13 21:36:08
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There's a growing global outcry over what critics call ''orphanage tourism." But some charities are proponents of volunteering in orphanages.
Posted: 2020-01-09 22:08:46
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The unanimous Montana Supreme Court decision found that religious institutions are not always obligated to report child sexual abuse to authorities due to an exemption in Montana state law.
Posted: 2020-01-08 10:00:58
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Stakes High For Democrats And Republicans In Bid To Rush ACA To Supreme Court
Both sides say they want the high court to quickly weigh in on a case that could invalidate the federal health law. Whatever the court decides will likely have consequences in 2020 elections.
Posted: 2020-01-07 20:56:07
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Over 900 Infants Died In One Hospital In India In 2019. What Went Wrong?
In December 10 children died within a 48-hour period — and that story made nationwide headlines. Politicians are casting blame — and the government is investigating.
Posted: 2020-01-07 18:42:00
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'Boys & Sex' Reveals That Young Men Feel 'Cut Off From Their Hearts'
Author Peggy Orenstein spoke to more than 100 young men of diverse backgrounds about sex, porn, gender and intimacy. Boys, she found, often lack "permission or space" to discuss their interior...
Posted: 2020-01-06 17:59:49
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'Scary Moms' Are Part Of The Citizen War Against Pollution In Pakistan
Environmental advocates in smog-choked Lahore say the Pakistani government has long downplayed the problem of air pollution. That might be changing.
Posted: 2020-01-01 15:27:47
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UNICEF Estimates 400,000 Babies Will Be Born On New Year's Day
Over half those births will happen in just eight countries, according to the U.N. agency.
Posted: 2019-12-31 19:19:01
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Reporters Pick Their Favorite Global Stories Of The Decade
The topics range from a ticking time bomb in the Arctic to the art of taking selfies in an ethical way. Here are the stories selected by our contributors.
Posted: 2019-12-31 15:26:10
www.npr.org
Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

Posted: 2020-01-21 11:30:58
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An economist uses a broad range of data from 132 countries to understand why middle age is such a drag.
Posted: 2020-01-17 21:13:49
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NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Nancy Lublin, CEO of Crisis Text Line, about what text messages say about people in need — and how her service uses that data.
Posted: 2020-01-17 10:07:00
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NPR's Rachel Martin talks to menopause expert Dr. JoAnn Pinkerto, division director of the Midlife Health Center at the University of Virginia, who answers listeners' questions.
Posted: 2020-01-16 10:06:10
www.npr.org
For Some Women Nearing Menopause, Depression And Anxiety Can Spike
Women with a history of depression and anxiety are at a higher risk of having a flair up during the time leading up to menopause. And getting doctors to take the issue seriously can be challenging.
Posted: 2020-01-13 10:04:01
www.npr.org
The Kratom Debate: Helpful Herb Or Dangerous Drug?
Some people struggling with opioid addiction who switched to kratom swear the herb salvaged their lives. But federal agencies and the brother of a man who died from his kratom use warn of its...
Posted: 2020-01-10 10:00:23
www.npr.org
Sweeps Of Homeless Camps In California Aggravate Key Health Issues
Cities have tasked police and sanitation workers with dismantling homeless camps that they say pose a risk to health and safety. But that's meant some displaced people are losing needed medications.
Posted: 2020-01-08 10:00:58
www.npr.org
Stakes High For Democrats And Republicans In Bid To Rush ACA To Supreme Court
Both sides say they want the high court to quickly weigh in on a case that could invalidate the federal health law. Whatever the court decides will likely have consequences in 2020 elections.
Posted: 2020-01-07 18:42:00
www.npr.org
'Boys & Sex' Reveals That Young Men Feel 'Cut Off From Their Hearts'
Author Peggy Orenstein spoke to more than 100 young men of diverse backgrounds about sex, porn, gender and intimacy. Boys, she found, often lack "permission or space" to discuss their interior...
Posted: 2020-01-04 12:00:50
www.npr.org
Hope, Happiness, And Social Connection: Hidden Benefits Of Regular Exercise
A new book, The Joy of Movement, offers more motivation to exercise. It's not just about getting fit or looking good: Exercise can give you courage, pleasure, and better friendships.
Posted: 2019-12-31 15:26:10
www.npr.org
Start Fresh: 6 Tips For Mental Health In 2020
Joy can be cultivated. Hostility often masks depression. As one year ends and another begins, these six insights and tips from psychologists offer hope for a good new year.

Posted: 2020-01-21 11:30:58
www.npr.org
An economist uses a broad range of data from 132 countries to understand why middle age is such a drag.
Posted: 2020-01-21 10:06:30
www.npr.org
The for-profit hospice industry has grown, allowing more Americans to die at home. But few family members realize that "hospice care" still means they'll do most of the physical and emotional...
Posted: 2020-01-12 12:00:49
www.npr.org
More reasons to commit to a race: A new study shows that novice runners who take on a marathon significantly improved their heart health. We've got tips to get you started.
Posted: 2019-12-28 11:00:15
www.npr.org
Objects That Matter: Memories Of Paradise
In the year since Paradise, Calif., was devastated by fire, certain flame-tinged objects — scorched pottery fragments or remnants of toys — have become talismans of resilience beyond pain.
Posted: 2019-12-20 15:32:00
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Do You Really Need A Flu Shot? Here's How To Decide
The internet abounds with myths about the relative risks of flu and flu shots, maybe partly because it's an annual shot and nobody likes needles. Here's the latest on what you might need —...
Posted: 2019-12-17 20:29:12
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Scientists Reach Out To Minority Communities To Diversify Alzheimer's Studies
Black and Hispanic people often don't volunteer for studies of Alzheimer's disease, despite their risks for developing it. Researchers are working to make studies more inclusive, but it's not...
Posted: 2019-12-16 16:01:19
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A Cancer Drug For Parkinson's? New Study Raises Hope, Draws Criticism
A leukemia drug seemed to help patients with Parkinson's disease. But critics say the results are equivocal and could raise false hopes.
Posted: 2019-12-16 10:00:20
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What Else Disappears If The ACA Is Overturned?
Though it has been on the books for nearly a decade, the Affordable Care Act faces a big court challenge right now that could overturn it. Here's what happens if the federal health law goes away.
Posted: 2019-12-06 20:56:00
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Will Glitches In Medicare's 'Plan Finder' Leave Some Seniors Stuck In The Wrong Plan?
With a deadline for Medicare enrollment looming, some lawmakers and advocates are concerned that Medicare hasn't done enough to reach out to consumers who might be affected by website problems.
Posted: 2019-12-05 16:00:55
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Scientists Find Surprising Age-Related Protein Waves In Blood
They've identified hundreds of proteins in human blood that wax and wane in surprising ways as we age. The findings could provide important clues about which substances in the blood can slow...