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Posted: 2019-10-22 20:21:53
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Calming techniques officers learn during training for intervening in a mental health crisis don't seem to work as well when a suspect is high on meth. Police say meth calls can be much more dangerous.
Posted: 2019-10-22 17:52:50
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The first global analysis of blood supply and demand finds that many developing countries are relying on risky emergency donations.
Posted: 2019-10-21 22:59:14
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Doctor-patient interactions can make a big difference to the effectiveness of treatments. In a new study, even a fake pain treatment helped when doctors believed it was real.
Posted: 2019-10-21 20:09:57
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Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes
A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
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Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-18 16:17:22
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What's Behind The Research Funding Gap For Black Scientists?
Black scientists more often seek grants for community health studies, but molecular-level research proposals win more funding. More diversity throughout the process could help close the gap,...
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:51:00
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Hospital Giant Sutter Health Agrees To Settlement In Big Antitrust Fight
Health care costs in Northern California, where Sutter Health dominates, are 20% to 30% higher than in Southern California, even after adjusting for cost of living. Settlement terms aren't yet...
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
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Doctors Faced With Tough Decisions Due To Shortage Of Drug Used To Treat Cancer
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Yoram Unguru, a hematologist and oncologist in Baltimore, about a shortage of vincristine, a drug used to treat childhood cancer.
Posted: 2019-10-16 09:05:00
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A Boy's Mysterious Illness Leads His Family On A Diagnostic Odyssey
Alex Yiu was born a healthy seeming baby. But by age 2, his muscle control and speech were deteriorating. His baffling condition took a decade to diagnose. The reanalysis of a DNA test was the...
Posted: 2019-10-15 13:05:09
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Your Guide To The Massive (And Massively Complex) Opioid Litigation
The largest-ever federal action related to the U.S. opioid crisis is on the cusp of its first trial next week — and it's complicated. So here's a brief(ish) explainer breaking it all down.

Posted: 2019-10-22 17:00:00
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Surgeon and researcher Marty Makary traveled the country talking to people about their experiences with health care. He learned that costs are poisoning Americans' relationships with medicine.
Posted: 2019-10-21 22:59:14
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Doctor-patient interactions can make a big difference to the effectiveness of treatments. In a new study, even a fake pain treatment helped when doctors believed it was real.
Posted: 2019-10-21 20:09:57
www.npr.org
A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.
Posted: 2019-10-21 16:07:49
www.npr.org
Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk
Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the dementia.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
www.npr.org
Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
www.npr.org
Gifted Students With Autism Find An Intellectual Oasis In Iowa
A center at the University of Iowa is making sure that its programs for gifted teens include those with autism spectrum disorders.
Posted: 2019-10-16 09:05:00
www.npr.org
A Boy's Mysterious Illness Leads His Family On A Diagnostic Odyssey
Alex Yiu was born a healthy seeming baby. But by age 2, his muscle control and speech were deteriorating. His baffling condition took a decade to diagnose. The reanalysis of a DNA test was the...
Posted: 2019-10-14 19:54:53
www.npr.org
High School Vape Culture Can Be Almost As Hard To Shake As Addiction, Teens Say
One in 4 high school seniors say they have vaped in the past month. And for heavy users, scary headlines about serious illness and death are no match for nicotine addiction and peer pressure.
Posted: 2019-10-14 07:47:28
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Researchers Try A Genetic Diabetes Test To Prevent Emergency Hospitalizations
Will a genetic test for Type 1 diabetes risk be valuable to parents, despite its shortcomings? Now many parents don't know their kids have this condition until they end up in the hospital.
Posted: 2019-10-10 09:07:00
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After A Life Of Painful Sickle Cell Disease, A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help
She's the first patient with a genetic disorder to be treated with the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR. The treatment has wrapped up and now she's waiting to see if it brings relief.

Posted: 2019-10-22 23:06:33
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Research yet again shows teens are glued to their phones to an unhealthy degree. In fact, they may be choosing social media over sleep. But maybe it's not all sad face, researchers say.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
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Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-20 21:08:00
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NPR's Michel Martin talks about the rising rates of suicide among teens and law enforcement officers with three experts: Sgt. Kevin Briggs, Jonathan Singer and Catherine Barber.
Posted: 2019-10-17 22:34:41
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Juul Suspends Sales of Flavored Vapes And Signs Settlement To Stop Marketing To Youth
Flavored e-cigarettes have hooked millions of teens to nicotine. Now, Juul says it will suspend sales of many flavors. Some call the move too little, too late.
Posted: 2019-10-17 16:38:50
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Childhood Obesity Is Rising "Shockingly Fast" — Even In Poor Countries
A comprehensive new report from UNICEF calls attention to the surge in obesity in developing countries — even as they're dealing with children who are undernourished.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
www.npr.org
Gifted Students With Autism Find An Intellectual Oasis In Iowa
A center at the University of Iowa is making sure that its programs for gifted teens include those with autism spectrum disorders.
Posted: 2019-10-16 20:26:34
www.npr.org
Doctors Faced With Tough Decisions Due To Shortage Of Drug Used To Treat Cancer
NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. Yoram Unguru, a hematologist and oncologist in Baltimore, about a shortage of vincristine, a drug used to treat childhood cancer.
Posted: 2019-10-16 16:21:04
www.npr.org
Poor People Are Still Sicker Than The Rich In Germany, Despite Universal Health Care
Even with generous health coverage, sizable health disparities persist between Hamburg's wealthier and poorer neighborhoods. Crowding, poor air quality and fewer physicians plague poorer areas.
Posted: 2019-10-16 09:05:00
www.npr.org
A Boy's Mysterious Illness Leads His Family On A Diagnostic Odyssey
Alex Yiu was born a healthy seeming baby. But by age 2, his muscle control and speech were deteriorating. His baffling condition took a decade to diagnose. The reanalysis of a DNA test was the...
Posted: 2019-10-14 19:54:53
www.npr.org
High School Vape Culture Can Be Almost As Hard To Shake As Addiction, Teens Say
One in 4 high school seniors say they have vaped in the past month. And for heavy users, scary headlines about serious illness and death are no match for nicotine addiction and peer pressure.

Posted: 2019-10-22 20:21:53
www.npr.org
Calming techniques officers learn during training for intervening in a mental health crisis don't seem to work as well when a suspect is high on meth. Police say meth calls can be much more dangerous.
Posted: 2019-10-22 09:00:42
www.npr.org
She was detained because she couldn't get a court hearing. She couldn't get a hearing because they are available only to people in psychiatric beds and the state's psychiatric facilities are...
Posted: 2019-10-21 16:07:49
www.npr.org
Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the dementia.
Posted: 2019-10-17 20:25:31
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DNA Tests For Psychiatric Drugs Are Controversial But Some Insurers Are Covering Them
Finding the right medication to treat mental health problems can be a frustrating trial-and-error process. New genetic tests aim to match meds to patients more effectively, but do they really...
Posted: 2019-10-16 16:21:04
www.npr.org
Poor People Are Still Sicker Than The Rich In Germany, Despite Universal Health Care
Even with generous health coverage, sizable health disparities persist between Hamburg's wealthier and poorer neighborhoods. Crowding, poor air quality and fewer physicians plague poorer areas.
Posted: 2019-10-14 19:54:53
www.npr.org
High School Vape Culture Can Be Almost As Hard To Shake As Addiction, Teens Say
One in 4 high school seniors say they have vaped in the past month. And for heavy users, scary headlines about serious illness and death are no match for nicotine addiction and peer pressure.
Posted: 2019-10-10 20:35:00
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Don't Force Patients Off Opioids Abruptly, New Guidelines Say, Warning Of Severe Risks
Researchers say chronic pain patients can feel suicidal or risk overdose when taken off medication too quickly. The warnings seek to course-correct after doctors felt pressured to taper drugs...
Posted: 2019-10-09 20:02:10
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Changing Your Diet Can Help Tamp Down Depression, Boost Mood
Depression symptoms dropped significantly in a group of young adults who ate a Mediterranean-style diet for three weeks. It's the latest study to show food can influence mental health.
Posted: 2019-10-07 09:05:00
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When Efforts To Eat 'Clean' Become An Unhealthy Obsession
Whether it's gluten or dairy, many people avoid certain types of foods these days. Sometimes, food avoidance can take over people's lives and veer into an eating disorder.
Posted: 2019-09-30 17:39:00
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Pediatricians Stand By Meds For ADHD, But Some Say Therapy Should Come First
New treatment guidelines don't assuage concerns that some children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are being prescribed medication too soon, before behavioral interventions are...

Posted: 2019-10-21 16:07:49
www.npr.org
Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the dementia.
Posted: 2019-10-21 09:00:00
www.npr.org
Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.
Posted: 2019-10-18 09:00:15
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As the Trump administration calls for expanding access to Medicare Advantage, a federal whistleblower lawsuit accuses a large Medicare Advantage plan of bilking Medicare out of $8 million.
Posted: 2019-10-07 09:01:21
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Phone Scammers And 'Teledoctors' Charged With Preying On Seniors In Fraud Case
Officials warn that schemes devised to steal from Medicare have embraced telemedicine. One man was prescribed $4,000 of medical equipment he didn't need and never asked for.
Posted: 2019-10-06 21:11:00
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Working Past Retirement Age
Bob Orozco is 89 and still leading fitness classes at the YMCA. He's among the 25% of Americans who are of retirement age but choose to keep working.
Posted: 2019-10-05 12:01:57
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Retiring To Volunteer
For older adults, having a sense of purpose can increase longevity and reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease. One retired teacher says she's found purpose in volunteering to help other seniors.
Posted: 2019-10-03 21:29:00
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Finding Affordable Senior Housing Is A Challenge For Many Americans. Here's Why
About half of private sector employers don't offer a retirement plan. That means about a quarter of Americans retire on not much more than social security, even those who've worked all their...
Posted: 2019-10-02 09:00:50
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Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire
People age 65 and older make up the fastest-growing group of workers in the U.S. Some want to work; some have to work — and their numbers are changing how we view retirement.
Posted: 2019-10-01 09:00:13
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State Border Splits Neighbors Into Medicaid Haves And Have-Nots
On the Illinois side of the Mississippi river, many families struggling financially can get health care, thanks to Medicaid expansion. Meanwhile, their neighbors on the Missouri side don't qualify.
Posted: 2019-09-28 00:32:04
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U.S. Justice Department Charges 35 People In Fraudulent Genetic Testing Scheme
Doctors, labworkers and telemarketers from around the U.S. were among those arrested in the investigation of a scheme that the DOJ alleges defrauded seniors and Medicare.