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Posted: 2019-08-22 18:34:56
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Washington Post journalist Scott Higham says recently released evidence shows the drug industry purposely shipped big quantities of opioids to communities without regard for how they were being...
Posted: 2019-08-22 17:23:59
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Scientists around the world are working to correct a problem with genetic health information — too much of it is currently based on samples of Europeans.
Posted: 2019-08-22 09:04:00
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NPR visited the only lab in the world known to be trying to use the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR to modify the DNA in human sperm. If successful, it could be used to prevent genetic disorders.
Posted: 2019-08-22 09:00:00
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Addiction Clinics Market Unproven Infusion Treatments To Desperate Patients
Some addiction treatment clinics offer IV infusions of a mix of supplements — including something known as NAD. The treatment isn't proven to work and is not FDA-approved for addiction.
Posted: 2019-08-21 18:03:20
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Poll: Nearly 1 in 5 Americans Says Pain Often Interferes With Daily Life
How do Americans experience and cope with pain that makes everyday life harder? We asked in the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll.
Posted: 2019-08-21 17:23:48
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Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People
A detailed comparison of mouse and human brain tissue found differences that could help explain why mice aren't always a good model for human diseases.
Posted: 2019-08-20 15:04:20
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Restrictions On Abortion Medication Deserve A Second Look, Says A Former FDA Head
The FDA heavily restricted mifepristone — a drug that ends early pregnancies — when it approved it 19 years ago. A former FDA commissioner asks whether the current restrictions should be...
Posted: 2019-08-19 09:04:52
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Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.
Posted: 2019-08-18 11:55:11
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This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives
The startup Mahmee hopes to help OB-GYNs, pediatricians and other health providers closely monitor a mother and baby's health so that any red flags can be assessed before they become life-threatening.
Posted: 2019-08-15 20:22:00
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These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail
No ordinary pair of shorts, these were designed by Harvard scientists to work with the wearer's own leg muscles when walking or running, and might make a soldier's heavy loads easier to carry.

Posted: 2019-08-21 18:03:20
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How do Americans experience and cope with pain that makes everyday life harder? We asked in the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll.
Posted: 2019-08-21 16:17:54
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Tell us about how you decided it was the right time to quit, what your strategy was, and what you learned that could be useful to other people trying to ditch the habit.
Posted: 2019-08-20 19:39:43
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Scientists are getting closer to developing a wearable patch that can measure hydration and other health markers — in sweat. The hope is it could give athletes more data to boost their performance.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:00:07
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Cigarettes Can't Be Advertised On TV. Should Juul Ads Be Permitted?
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:19:26
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Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?
A Canadian study suggests that fluoride consumed by pregnant women can affect the IQ of their children. No single study provides definitive answers, but the findings will no doubt stir debate.
Posted: 2019-08-19 09:04:52
www.npr.org
Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.
Posted: 2019-08-16 21:27:00
www.npr.org
What's Behind A Cluster Of Vaping-Related Hospitalizations?
Dozens of people in the Midwest have been hospitalized with severe lung damage in the past month. It's unclear what exactly is causing the issue but the common link appears to be vaping.
Posted: 2019-08-16 12:00:26
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Fresh Starts, Guilty Pleasures And Other Pro Tips For Sticking To Good Habits
For most of us, sticking to a good habit is a battle of will. But the researchers who study habit formation turn to science to help curtail their own tendency to slack off.
Posted: 2019-08-15 15:06:38
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Do You Need All Those Meds? How To Talk To Your Doctor About Cutting Back
Drug combinations can cause side effects like confusion and dizziness — and even increase the risk for falls. Here's how to talk to your doctor about reducing or eliminating some prescriptions.
Posted: 2019-08-13 18:33:00
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Air Pollution May Be As Harmful To Your Lungs As Smoking Cigarettes, Study Finds
Smog can spike during hot days. A new study finds that the effects of breathing air pollution may be cumulative. Long-term exposure may lead to lung disease, even among people who've never smoked.

Posted: 2019-08-22 17:36:01
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Mayors from 70 American cities send a letter to the Trump administration, saying a plan to push millions of people out of the federal food stamp program would punish some of the country's neediest.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:00:07
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Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-19 21:50:00
www.npr.org
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford, who specializes in obesity medicine, about a new app from WW — formerly Weight Watchers — that targets children.
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:19:26
www.npr.org
Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?
A Canadian study suggests that fluoride consumed by pregnant women can affect the IQ of their children. No single study provides definitive answers, but the findings will no doubt stir debate.
Posted: 2019-08-18 11:55:11
www.npr.org
This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives
The startup Mahmee hopes to help OB-GYNs, pediatricians and other health providers closely monitor a mother and baby's health so that any red flags can be assessed before they become life-threatening.
Posted: 2019-08-17 12:00:38
www.npr.org
Netflix Curbs Tobacco Use Onscreen, But Not Pot. What's Up With That?
TV networks have standards that minimize tobacco use on shows, and Netflix now does, too. But streaming companies lack public policies about smoking cannabis onscreen, and doctors say that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-16 21:27:00
www.npr.org
What's Behind A Cluster Of Vaping-Related Hospitalizations?
Dozens of people in the Midwest have been hospitalized with severe lung damage in the past month. It's unclear what exactly is causing the issue but the common link appears to be vaping.
Posted: 2019-08-15 04:06:00
www.npr.org
Most Kids On Medicaid Who Are Prescribed ADHD Drugs Don't Get Proper Follow-Up
An inspector general report from the Department of Health and Human Services found that 100,000 kids who were newly prescribed ADHD medication didn't see a care provider for months afterward.
Posted: 2019-08-10 12:34:53
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At 'High Five' Camp, Struggling With A Disability Is The Point
A day camp in Nashville uses "constraint-induced therapy" to help kids who have physical weakness on one side — often because of a stroke or cerebral palsy — gain strength and independence.
Posted: 2019-08-09 21:44:00
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American With No Medical Training Ran Center For Malnourished Ugandan Kids. 105 Died
When she was 19, Renee Bach founded a charity that went on to care for over 900 severely malnourished babies and children, Now she is being sued by two of the mothers whose children died.

Posted: 2019-08-22 09:00:00
www.npr.org
Some addiction treatment clinics offer IV infusions of a mix of supplements — including something known as NAD. The treatment isn't proven to work and is not FDA-approved for addiction.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:00:07
www.npr.org
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-19 21:50:00
www.npr.org
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford, who specializes in obesity medicine, about a new app from WW — formerly Weight Watchers — that targets children.
Posted: 2019-08-19 21:10:00
www.npr.org
New Research Casts Doubt On Connection Between Smartphone Use And Teen Mental Health
New research casts doubt on the connection between smartphone use and teens' mental health. Some argue it is a case of correlation, not causation, and that the threat is overblown.
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:54:00
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Cave Diver Risks All To Explore Places 'Where Nobody Has Ever Been'
"The big picture of survival is sometimes so hard to see, but we always know what we can do to make the next best step toward survival," says cave diver, photographer and memoirist Jill Heinerth.
Posted: 2019-08-19 09:04:00
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Got Pain? A Virtual Swim With Dolphins May Help Melt It Away
A recent study found virtual reality experiences were better at easing pain than watching televised nature scenes. Immersive distraction seems key to the success, scientists say.
Posted: 2019-08-19 09:04:00
www.npr.org
Researchers Examine Altitude's Role In Depression And Suicide
The Mountain West has some of the highest rates of depression and suicide. Researchers think the mountains, with a lack of oxygen at high altitude, could be interfering with people's mental health.
Posted: 2019-08-14 16:58:00
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'Lithium' Is A Homage To A Drug — And To The Renegade Side Of Science
By celebrating those who applied the substance as a drug, Walter A. Brown aims to raise awareness — and to demolish what remains of the myth that scientific progress is driven by rigorous dispassion.
Posted: 2019-08-14 15:40:38
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MDMA, Aka Ecstasy, Shows Promise As A PTSD Treatment
Drugs like molly and ecstasy may be best known for giving partyers euphoric feelings. But MDMA, the drugs' psychoactive ingredient, is proving effective at treating severe trauma when used in...
Posted: 2019-08-13 16:25:23
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Hooked On The Internet, South Korean Teens Go Into Digital Detox
Online gaming and other digital activities cause problems in people's health, relationships and studies. Government centers treat teen boys and girls who struggle to cut down on use of tech devices.

Posted: 2019-08-15 15:06:38
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Drug combinations can cause side effects like confusion and dizziness — and even increase the risk for falls. Here's how to talk to your doctor about reducing or eliminating some prescriptions.
Posted: 2019-08-09 09:00:25
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Critics worry the administration's delays come at a steep cost: Medicare is continuing to pay for millions of unnecessary exams and patients are being subjected to radiation for no medical benefit.
Posted: 2019-08-07 19:20:59
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In rural communities, loneliness and lack of social connection are taking a toll on the elderly and young alike. One group in Minnesota is trying to solve the problem by connecting the generations.
Posted: 2019-08-01 14:00:07
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$2,733 To Treat Iron-Poor Blood? Iron Infusions For Anemia Under Scrutiny
Iron-deficiency anemia is often remedied with drugstore iron pills. But if that doesn't work, doctors sometimes prescribe iron infusions — and the bill for that can vary by thousands of dollars....
Posted: 2019-07-27 12:00:04
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Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide
The golden years are thought to be a well-earned, carefree time in life. But adults 65 and older now account for almost 1 in 5 suicides in America.
Posted: 2019-07-27 11:00:55
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg On Love And Other Things
"I miss him every morning," the Supreme Court justice said of her late husband and booster, Marty, in an interview with NPR's Nina Totenberg.
Posted: 2019-07-23 09:00:03
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Missouri Firm With Silicon Valley Ties Faces Medicare Billing Scrutiny
A federal audit and a whistleblower lawsuit allege Medicare Advantage plans from the St. Louis-based Essence Group Holdings Corporation have significantly overcharged taxpayers.
Posted: 2019-07-18 20:04:00
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Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?
Researchers are testing exercise in people at high risk for Alzheimer's. The goal of a federally funded study is to learn whether aerobic physical activity can protect the brain.
Posted: 2019-07-17 21:58:18
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LGBTQ Americans Could Be At Higher Risk For Dementia, Study Finds
Research presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Convention found that LGBTQ Americans are three times more likely to experience cognitive decline than their non-LGBTQ counterparts.
Posted: 2019-07-17 21:58:18
www.npr.org
LGBTQ Americans Could Be At Higher Risk For Dementia, Study Finds
Research presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Convention found that LGBTQ Americans are three times more likely to experience cognitive decline than their non-LGBTQ counterparts.