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Posted: 2019-06-23 15:56:00
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Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and recovery time is shorter. Those are a few reasons why more medical schools are training students how to be better robotic surgeons.
Posted: 2019-06-23 12:17:50
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Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and recovery time is shorter. Those are a few reasons why more medical schools are training students how to be better robotic surgeons.
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:00
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A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:57:00
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Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot
As more states legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana, veterinarians are treating more intoxicated dogs who've gotten into THC edibles, discarded joints or drug-laced feces.
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:55:40
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When There's No Doctor Nearby, Volunteers Help Rural Patients Manage Chronic Illness
Many rural people live too far from a doctor to visit one regularly. In Wyoming, volunteers offer health skills trainings to help patients stay on top of chronic conditions.
Posted: 2019-06-19 16:16:36
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When Surgeons Are Abrasive To Coworkers, Patients' Health May Suffer
A new study shows a link between how surgeons act around coworkers and their patients' outcomes. Turns out rudeness and other unprofessional behavior isn't just obnoxious, it may be dangerous.
Posted: 2019-06-18 19:44:41
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Florida Wants To Import Medicine From Canada. But How Would That Work?
A bill Gov. Ron DeSantis signed this month would let Florida make bulk purchases of prescription drugs from Canada. It's now law, but still faces big hurdles that could keep it from becoming...
Posted: 2019-06-17 17:50:00
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A Clearer Map For Aging: 'Elderhood' Shows How Geriatricians Can Help
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, Elderhood.
Posted: 2019-06-17 09:02:00
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A Year After Spinal Surgery, A $94,000 Bill Feels Like A Backbreaker
A service called neuromonitoring can cut the risk of nerve damage during delicate surgery. But some patients are receiving large bills they didn't expect.
Posted: 2019-06-14 21:22:22
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Be Careful Of Fecal Transplants, Warns FDA, After Patient Death
The FDA has strengthened oversight of experimental fecal transplants after a patient died of an infection. The donor's stool contained disease-causing pathogens, but was not tested before use.

Posted: 2019-06-24 09:01:00
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Many events in our adult lives involve drinking alcohol such as weddings, funerals and office parties. But a new movement is making living sober look glamorous.
Posted: 2019-06-24 09:01:00
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The sober curious movement — people who are limiting their alcohol consumption — is relatively new. Early research suggests that even taking a short break from booze is good for your health.
Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
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Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your...
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:57:00
www.npr.org
Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot
As more states legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana, veterinarians are treating more intoxicated dogs who've gotten into THC edibles, discarded joints or drug-laced feces.
Posted: 2019-06-17 09:02:00
www.npr.org
A Year After Spinal Surgery, A $94,000 Bill Feels Like A Backbreaker
A service called neuromonitoring can cut the risk of nerve damage during delicate surgery. But some patients are receiving large bills they didn't expect.
Posted: 2019-06-11 16:14:00
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Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says people at high risk of being infected with HIV should be offered a daily pill containing antiretroviral medications. The drug's cost remains a hurdle.
Posted: 2019-06-10 20:38:00
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A Musical Brain May Help Us Understand Language And Appreciate Tchaikovsky
Compared with monkeys, humans have a brain that is extremely sensitive to a sound's pitch. And that may reflect our exposure to speech and music.
Posted: 2019-06-10 09:00:00
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Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?
Changing how the mind reacts to pain can reduce the discomfort experienced, according to scientists who study brain pathways that regulate pain. A new type of therapy aims to enhance that effect.
Posted: 2019-06-06 19:50:29
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Social Security Error Jeopardizes Medicare Coverage For 250,000 Seniors
A billing glitch could cause lapses in private drug policies and Medicare Advantage plans that provide both medical and drug coverage. Premiums weren't deducted from some Social Security checks.
Posted: 2019-06-06 18:19:00
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Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies
It turns out you aren't simply a clone of cells from the womb. Over a lifetime, mutations create a patchwork of tissues made with pieces that have subtly different genetic signatures.

Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:00
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NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the unsanitary conditions for detained migrant children in border detention facilities.
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:00
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A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.
Posted: 2019-06-12 15:50:00
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Having to come up with $1,000 unexpectedly can be a challenge for anyone. NPR's recent poll on rural health found that especially true for one group: people with disabilities.
Posted: 2019-06-06 19:04:09
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Could Antibiotics Be A Silver Bullet For Kids In Africa?
A study from Niger reveals a dramatic drop in mortality among children given a twice-yearly dose of azithromycin. Yet concern remains about the potential impact on antibiotic resistance.
Posted: 2019-06-05 09:00:00
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How Doctors Can Stop Stigmatizing — And Start Helping — Kids With Obesity
Physicians often harbor unconscious bias against kids and teens with obesity. It affects how they talk with their patients and can make kids' health worse. Some doctors are trying a new approach.
Posted: 2019-06-04 20:38:00
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House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies
A congressional committee has upheld a prohibition against the Food and Drug Administration considering using gene-edited embryos to establish pregnancies.
Posted: 2019-06-03 20:19:04
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How To Do Brain Surgery In A War Zone
Dr. Omar Ibrahim is a neurosurgeon at the only working hospital in Syria's south Idlib province. The staff, he told NPR via Skype, has "just moved into the basement [because of] the attacks."
Posted: 2019-06-03 15:49:00
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2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death
Analysis of DNA from more than 400,000 people in the U.K. suggests a genetic modification that protects against HIV may actually increase the overall risk of premature death.
Posted: 2019-05-31 11:13:00
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It Looked As Though Millions Of Babies Would Miss Out On A Lifesaving Vaccine
Last fall, Merck said it would stop selling its rotavirus vaccine to West Africa and redirect its supply to China at a higher price. After NPR broke the story, the situation changed — for the...
Posted: 2019-05-31 09:01:00
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News Brief: Tariffs On Mexico, Missouri Clinic, Rotavirus Vaccine
Trump announces a 5% tax on all goods from Mexico. Missouri may soon be without a clinic that provides abortions. And, which companies stepped up to supply the rotavirus vaccine in West Africa.

Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
www.npr.org
Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your...
Posted: 2019-06-21 12:59:06
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In 2014, Nora McInerny experienced a wave of loss that reshaped her whole life. Despite the painful memories from that year, she explains why she doesn't want to "move on" from her grief.
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:57:00
www.npr.org
As more states legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana, veterinarians are treating more intoxicated dogs who've gotten into THC edibles, discarded joints or drug-laced feces.
Posted: 2019-06-17 17:17:00
www.npr.org
Meth In The Morning, Heroin At Night: Inside The Seesaw Struggle of Dual Addiction
Many users now mix opioids with stimulants such as meth and cocaine. Researchers say efforts to get doctors to reduce opioid prescriptions may have driven some users to buy meth on the street...
Posted: 2019-06-17 09:02:00
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Adolescents' Tech Addiction Is A Growing Problem, Therapists Say
A Minnesota clinic says 75 percent of its adolescent clients overuse technology, and wind up receiving addiction treatment for that while dealing with other issues.
Posted: 2019-06-13 09:00:00
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Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say
The U.S. government has doled out at least $2.4 billion in state grants since 2017, specifically targeting the opioid epidemic. Yet drug abuse problems seldom involve only one substance.
Posted: 2019-06-12 15:50:00
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Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability
Having to come up with $1,000 unexpectedly can be a challenge for anyone. NPR's recent poll on rural health found that especially true for one group: people with disabilities.
Posted: 2019-06-10 09:00:00
www.npr.org
Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?
Changing how the mind reacts to pain can reduce the discomfort experienced, according to scientists who study brain pathways that regulate pain. A new type of therapy aims to enhance that effect.
Posted: 2019-06-08 11:00:14
www.npr.org
Storytelling Helps Hospital Staff Discover The Person Within The Patient
VA hospitals are recording patients' life stories to help strengthen understanding between patients and their caregivers. Including such stories in medical records may even improve health outcomes.
Posted: 2019-06-07 09:00:22
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'Mental Health Parity' Is Still An Elusive Goal In U.S. Insurance Coverage
The Affordable Care Act and other U.S. laws sought to put insurance coverage for mental health conditions on equal footing with coverage for physical conditions. But patients say that's not happening.

Posted: 2019-06-17 17:50:00
www.npr.org
Physician Louise Aronson treats patients who are in their 60s — as well as those who are older than 100. She writes about changing approaches to elder health care in the book, Elderhood.
Posted: 2019-06-12 15:50:00
www.npr.org
Having to come up with $1,000 unexpectedly can be a challenge for anyone. NPR's recent poll on rural health found that especially true for one group: people with disabilities.
Posted: 2019-06-12 10:01:00
www.npr.org
Workers in nursing homes, hospital ERs and other health facilities are required by law to notify police whenever they notice likely signs of physical or sexual abuse. But that's often not happening.
Posted: 2019-06-08 11:00:14
www.npr.org
Storytelling Helps Hospital Staff Discover The Person Within The Patient
VA hospitals are recording patients' life stories to help strengthen understanding between patients and their caregivers. Including such stories in medical records may even improve health outcomes.
Posted: 2019-06-06 19:50:29
www.npr.org
Social Security Error Jeopardizes Medicare Coverage For 250,000 Seniors
A billing glitch could cause lapses in private drug policies and Medicare Advantage plans that provide both medical and drug coverage. Premiums weren't deducted from some Social Security checks.
Posted: 2019-06-06 18:19:00
www.npr.org
Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies
It turns out you aren't simply a clone of cells from the womb. Over a lifetime, mutations create a patchwork of tissues made with pieces that have subtly different genetic signatures.
Posted: 2019-05-25 12:00:55
www.npr.org
What's Your Purpose? Finding A Sense Of Meaning In Life Is Linked To Health
Researchers found that people who did not have a strong life purpose were more likely to die than those who did — specifically more likely to die of cardiovascular diseases.
Posted: 2019-05-21 18:39:35
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'Dementia Reimagined' Asks: Can There Be Happiness For Those With Memory Loss?
While caring for her mother, who had dementia, bioethicist Tia Powell began imagining a different way to approach the disease. Her new book looks at long-term care options and end-of-life decisions.
Posted: 2019-05-09 19:23:00
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Lubrication And Lots Of Communication: Navigating A New Sexual Life After Menopause
A new book, Flash Count Diary, celebrates the emotional and creative freedom of postmenopausal intimacy. Author Darcey Steinke is here to say, sex can be better than ever after midlife.
Posted: 2019-05-05 13:06:00
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From Gloom To Gratitude: 8 Skills To Cultivate Joy
Reaching out in kindness, mindful breathing and taking time daily to note positive moments and personal strengths are all part of a program that reduces anxiety and depression. But it takes practice.