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Posted: 2019-08-14 09:03:00
www.npr.org
President Trump has made creating a Space Force a key line in his campaign rallies. Congress is now on board due to concerns about security threats to satellites and the chance to land more jobs.
Posted: 2019-08-11 11:00:55
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It started as a joke, as President Trump riffed on the idea last year. Now, Congress could create the first, new military service in more than 70 years.
Posted: 2019-08-08 20:23:26
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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Wired writer Daniel Oberhaus about a failed lunar mission that left a few thousand tardigrades a microscopic animal, on the moon.
Posted: 2019-08-06 09:39:00
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Amid Protests In Hawaii Against Giant Telescope, Astronomers Look To 'Plan B'
An international consortium planning the Thirty Meter Telescope still prefers to site it atop the Big Island's Mauna Kea. But local protests may drive the project to the Canary Islands.
Posted: 2019-08-02 19:50:16
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Chile And Telescopes Are A Match Made In Heaven
The South American country is home to the Andes Mountains and the Atacama Desert, places that have some of the stillest and driest air in the world. That makes them ideal for astronomy.
Posted: 2019-07-26 09:02:00
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Ask Cokie: The 50th Anniversary Of Apollo 11
With the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, what has the space program meant for America? NPR's Steve Inskeep and commentator Cokie Roberts take listener questions.
Posted: 2019-07-24 21:11:00
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In Alabama, Huntsville Continues To Play A Large Role In NASA's Exploration Efforts
Huntsville, Ala., was one of the key cities that helped NASA get to the moon in 1969. Fifty years later, Huntsville still plays a big role in NASA's present and future space exploration efforts.
Posted: 2019-07-24 09:01:11
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New Telescope Promises To Revolutionize Astronomy
A powerful telescope is taking shape in the Chilean Andes. When finished, it will repeatedly image huge swaths of the sky, searching for rare events such as merging stars and other events.
Posted: 2019-07-23 09:01:00
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Chris Kraft, Architect Of NASA's Mission Control, Dies At Age Of 95
One of the architect's of NASA's mission control has died at age 95. Chris Kraft was one of the original employees of the space task group and the agency's first flight director.
Posted: 2019-07-22 23:45:28
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Chris Kraft, One Of The Architects Of The U.S. Space Program, Dies At 95
Kraft was among the earliest employees of NASA and designed mission control and other components of the program. He became head of the Johnson Space Center and oversaw the birth of the space...

Posted: 2019-08-22 17:23:59
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Scientists around the world are working to correct a problem with genetic health information — too much of it is currently based on samples of Europeans.
Posted: 2019-08-22 09:00:00
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The Congressional Budget Office revises its federal deficit estimate. New policy would allow the government to indefinitely detain children with their families. And, the results of a DNA experiment.
Posted: 2019-08-21 17:52:22
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Picture a hairless, wrinkly rodent about the size of a small sweet potato — kinda cool, kinda weird. They also are extraordinarily long-lived. Researchers are lining up to study their secrets.
Posted: 2019-08-21 17:23:48
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Subtle Differences In Brain Cells Hint at Why Many Drugs Help Mice But Not People
A detailed comparison of mouse and human brain tissue found differences that could help explain why mice aren't always a good model for human diseases.
Posted: 2019-08-21 11:00:45
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More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier
The U.S. recycling industry is facing a quandary: Too much of the plastic we use can't be recycled, and taxpayers increasingly are on the hook for paying for all that trash to hit the landfills.
Posted: 2019-08-20 19:27:11
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U.S. Recycling Industry Is Struggling to Figure Out A Future Without China
China is no longer taking the world's waste. The U.S. recycling industry is overwhelmed — it can't keep up with the plastic being churned out. This doesn't bode well for our plastic waste problem.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:04:00
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Perfect Storm Hits U.S. Recycling Industry
Since Woodbury, N.J., began the nation's first mandatory curbside recycling program, the industry is in trouble. China has stopped taking all the plastic so facilities are overwhelmed.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:00:07
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Cigarettes Can't Be Advertised On TV. Should Juul Ads Be Permitted?
Though tobacco ads have been banned from TV for about 50 years, the marketing of electronic cigarettes isn't constrained by the law. Public health advocates consider that a loophole that hurts...
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:54:00
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Cave Diver Risks All To Explore Places 'Where Nobody Has Ever Been'
"The big picture of survival is sometimes so hard to see, but we always know what we can do to make the next best step toward survival," says cave diver, photographer and memoirist Jill Heinerth.
Posted: 2019-08-19 16:19:26
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Can Maternal Fluoride Consumption During Pregnancy Lower Children's Intelligence?
A Canadian study suggests that fluoride consumed by pregnant women can affect the IQ of their children. No single study provides definitive answers, but the findings will no doubt stir debate.

Posted: 2019-08-22 15:25:46
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Israel has begun using the technology at its West Bank checkpoints to verify Palestinians' identities as they cross into Israel. The new system means shorter wait times but is drawing criticism.
Posted: 2019-08-21 20:28:00
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NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Josephine Wolff, a professor at Tufts University, about software that is available to help ransomware victims recover their files and why it is rarely used in...
Posted: 2019-08-21 15:05:35
the1a.org
The 25-year-old has gone from posting tech reviews in his childhood home to interviewing Tesla's Elon Musk.
Posted: 2019-08-21 11:00:45
www.npr.org
More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier
The U.S. recycling industry is facing a quandary: Too much of the plastic we use can't be recycled, and taxpayers increasingly are on the hook for paying for all that trash to hit the landfills.
Posted: 2019-08-21 09:01:45
www.npr.org
How A Tip — And Facial Recognition Technology — Helped The FBI Catch A Killer
Even as civil libertarians warn about the increased use of facial recognition by federal authorities, the bureau is using it to track down some of its most wanted suspects.
Posted: 2019-08-20 20:23:00
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Twitter And Facebook Shut Down Fake Propaganda Accounts Run By Chinese Government
NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Adam Segal, at the Council on Foreign Relations, about Facebook and Twitter shutting down hundreds of fake accounts run by the Chinese government.
Posted: 2019-08-20 15:30:58
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Ironic, Informal And Expressive, 'New Rules Of Language' Evolve Online
A lively new book by Gretchen McCulloch dissects the common vernacular that forms the cornerstone of online communication. Because Internet parses emojis, lols and punctuation — or lack thereof.
Posted: 2019-08-20 14:16:32
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23 Texas Towns Hit With Ransomware Attack In 'New Front' Of Cyberassault
Investigators haven't identified who or what is behind the attack that took systems offline, but the Texas Department of Information Resources says the evidence points to "one single threat actor."
Posted: 2019-08-20 10:07:00
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How China Uses Twitter And Facebook To Share Disinformation About Hong Kong
Russia gets most of the attention when it comes to malicious use of social media by state actors. The protests in Hong Kong have made clear China is using the same playbook.
Posted: 2019-08-20 09:04:00
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Hong Kong Protests: China Accused Of Using Fake Social Media Accounts
Facebook and Twitter have suspended accounts associated with the Chinese government, accusing officials of using those accounts to spread disinformation to disrupt the Hong Kong protests.

Posted: 2019-08-22 17:04:38
www.sciencedaily.com
Coordinated observations of Jupiter in early 2017 by six ground-based telescopes and Hubble allowed astronomers to study the evolution of bright plumes and connect them with cloud movements deep...
Posted: 2019-08-22 15:34:05
www.sciencedaily.com
Polymer chemists and materials scientists have achieved some notable advances that mimic Nature, but one of the most common and practical features of cells has so far been out of reach -- intracellular...
Posted: 2019-08-22 15:34:00
www.sciencedaily.com
Researchers have discovered a scorpion toxin that targets the 'wasabi receptor,' a chemical-sensing protein found in nerve cells that's responsible for the sinus-jolting sting of wasabi. Because...
Posted: 2019-08-22 15:33:58
www.sciencedaily.com
High-precision technique stores cellular 'memory' in DNA
Researchers have created a technology called DOMINO to store complex 'memories' in the DNA of living cells, including human cells. This memory storage capacity can form the foundation of complex...
Posted: 2019-08-22 14:14:17
www.sciencedaily.com
New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle
Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject...
Posted: 2019-08-22 13:40:14
www.sciencedaily.com
Artificial muscles bloom, dance, and wave
Researchers have developed an ultrathin, artificial muscle for soft robotics. The advancement was demonstrated with a robotic blooming flower brooch, dancing robotic butterflies and fluttering...
Posted: 2019-08-22 12:11:58
www.sciencedaily.com
There are way more species of horseshoe bats than scientists thought
Horseshoe bats are bizarre-looking animals with giant ears and elaborate flaps of skin on their noses that they use like satellite dishes. There are about a hundred different species of horseshoe...
Posted: 2019-08-22 12:11:56
www.sciencedaily.com
Switching on the Atlantic Ocean heat pump
34 million years ago the warm 'greenhouse climate' of the dinosaur age ended and the colder 'icehouse climate' of today commenced. Antarctica glaciated first and geological data imply that the...
Posted: 2019-08-21 18:27:14
www.sciencedaily.com
Self-folding 'Rollbot' paves the way for fully untethered soft robots
The majority of soft robots today rely on external power and control, keeping them tethered to off-board systems or rigged with hard components. Now, researchers have developed soft robotic systems,...
Posted: 2019-08-21 16:55:19
www.sciencedaily.com
Physicists create world's smallest engine
The research explains how random fluctuations affect the operation of microscopic machines like this tiny motor. In the future, such devices could be incorporated into other technologies to recycle...

Posted: 2019-08-22 17:04:38
www.sciencedaily.com
Coordinated observations of Jupiter in early 2017 by six ground-based telescopes and Hubble allowed astronomers to study the evolution of bright plumes and connect them with cloud movements deep...
Posted: 2019-08-22 16:55:01
www.sciencedaily.com
Light touch plays a critical role in everyday tasks, such as picking up a glass or playing a musical instrument, as well as for detecting the touch of, say, biting insects. Researchers have discovered...
Posted: 2019-08-22 15:34:00
www.sciencedaily.com
Researchers have discovered a scorpion toxin that targets the 'wasabi receptor,' a chemical-sensing protein found in nerve cells that's responsible for the sinus-jolting sting of wasabi. Because...
Posted: 2019-08-22 13:40:20
www.sciencedaily.com
Australian men's life expectancy tops other men's
Australian men are now living longer than any other group of males in the world, according to new research.
Posted: 2019-08-21 15:18:16
www.sciencedaily.com
Is it autism? The line is getting increasingly blurry
If the current trend in diagnostic practices holds, the definition of autism may get too blurry to be meaningful, a research team finds.
Posted: 2019-08-20 14:16:23
www.sciencedaily.com
Stardust in the Antarctic snow
The rare isotope iron-60 is created in massive stellar explosions. Only a very small amount of this isotope reaches the earth from distant stars. Now, a research team has discovered iron-60 in...
Posted: 2019-08-20 12:18:33
www.sciencedaily.com
Hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders
Researchers who rush in after storms to study the behavior of spiders have found that extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones may have an evolutionary impact on populations living in...
Posted: 2019-08-19 20:43:46
www.sciencedaily.com
Biochemists discover new insights into what may go awry in brains of Alzheimer's patients
Three decades of research on Alzheimer's disease have not produced major treatment advances for patients. Researchers now report new insights that may lead to progress in fighting the devastating...
Posted: 2019-08-19 20:43:40
www.sciencedaily.com
Roadmap for detecting changes in ocean due to climate change
When will we see significant changes in the ocean due to climate change? A new study finds that some changes are noticeable already, while others will take up to a century.
Posted: 2019-08-19 15:27:32
www.sciencedaily.com
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
Scientists are investigating new ways to provide visual signals to the blind by directly stimulating the optic nerve. Their preliminary study uses a new type of neural electrode and provides...