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Posted: 2019-06-20 16:07:36
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American attitudes toward space exploration and NASA's priorities have changed ahead of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.
Posted: 2019-06-14 18:48:00
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These works make apparent how singular an achievement America's moon landing was — and show that half a century later we're still grappling to understand its long-term meaning.
Posted: 2019-06-13 21:54:00
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The name pays tribute to the legacy of African American women who played a major role in the space race but were long overlooked by history.
Posted: 2019-06-13 10:42:00
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Street Outside NASA Headquarters Renamed: Hidden Figures Way
Three black female mathematicians' contributions at NASA were overlooked until the book and movie Hidden Figures. The street renaming coincides with the upcoming anniversary of the first moon...
Posted: 2019-06-12 16:25:32
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'One Giant Leap' Explores The Herculean Effort Behind The 1969 Moon Landing
Fifty years after Apollo 11's historic moon landing, journalist Charles Fishman tells the story of the 410,000 men and women who helped make the mission a success.
Posted: 2019-06-12 09:02:00
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NASA Engineers Try To Remedy Stuck Probe On Mars
An instrument on NASA's Mars InSight mission that was supposed to be driven into the planet's soil is stuck. It's designed to measure Mars's internal temperature.
Posted: 2019-06-03 20:49:00
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Astronomers Worry That Elon Musk's New Satellites Will Ruin The View
The billionaire wants to deploy thousands of satellites in order to provide global Internet, but astronomers say they could create unsightly glare.
Posted: 2019-06-02 12:22:00
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Amateur Astronomers Gather For 'Star Parties'
Light pollution has taken away much of the night sky. But there are still places far from city lights where amateur astronomers gather with their telescopes for what they call "star parties."
Posted: 2019-05-25 12:20:00
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Why Corned Beef Sandwiches — And The Rest Of The Universe — Exist
Somehow, at the beginning of time, there was an imbalance of matter and antimatter. That's how all the stuff in the universe came about. Scientists think they may find an answer by studying neutrons.
Posted: 2019-05-24 13:18:01
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Phil Plait: How Can Mistakes Lead To Scientific Advancement?
When it comes to scientific research, mistakes are not only part of—but also crucial—to the process. Phil Plait explains how small setbacks can play a critical role in making big discoveries.

Posted: 2019-06-23 21:11:02
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Researchers say teaching seals to copy melodies might help inform speech therapy for humans.
Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
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Tens of thousands of Instagram followers can't be wrong: Curiosity about the sober life is trending. Scientists say cutting out alcohol can improve your sleep and blood pressure, and help your...
Posted: 2019-06-21 20:25:00
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Are young people really growing horns from using their smart phones? The short answer is no, but for a while media coverage seemed to suggest otherwise.
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:19
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A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies
A Moscow scientist claims he has a safe way of editing genes in human embryos — a method that could protect resulting babies from being infected with HIV. Approval of the experiment seems unlikely.
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:08:00
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What Dropping 17,000 Wallets Around The Globe Can Teach Us About Honesty
Scientists used "lost" wallets to test whether people are more likely to be dishonest when they might profit. The results were puzzling — so they put more money in the wallets.
Posted: 2019-06-19 21:29:00
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There's More To Look Forward To After Peaking Professionally
Social scientist Arthur Brooks set out to figure out how life after 50 can be more professionally fulfilling. His advice? "Stop being an innovator and start being an instructor."
Posted: 2019-06-19 18:39:22
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I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers
Scientists are using old spy satellite images to measure the effects of climate change. They're finding that glaciers in the Himalayas are melting twice as fast as they were a few decades earlier.
Posted: 2019-06-19 15:12:24
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Trump Administration Weakens Climate Plan To Help Coal Plants Stay Open
The Trump administration is replacing one of President Obama's signature plans to address climate change. It could help some coal-fired power plants, but likely won't slow the industry's decline.
Posted: 2019-06-19 14:06:30
the1a.org
Desperate Measures: The Skyrocketing Price Of Insulin In America
In the U.S., there’s another kind of caravan crossing borders in search of survival: diabetic Americans traveling to Canada to get cheaper insulin.
Posted: 2019-06-19 09:07:19
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Boaty McBoatface Makes Discovery
In the years since the goofy name of a research vessel grabbed international headlines, Boaty has been off gathering crucial deep-sea data on the effects of climate change.

Posted: 2019-06-23 21:32:13
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Robocalls are more than just a nuisance when they target healthcare centers. NPR's Michel Martin discusses this with Dave Summitt, chief information security officer at the Moffitt Cancer Center.
Posted: 2019-06-23 15:56:31
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Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and recovery time is shorter. Those are a few reasons why more medical schools are training students how to be better robotic surgeons.
Posted: 2019-06-23 12:17:50
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Robot-assisted surgery is minimally invasive and recovery time is shorter. Those are a few reasons why more medical schools are training students how to be better robotic surgeons.
Posted: 2019-06-22 21:10:00
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Criticism Surrounds Facebook's Proposed Jump Into Cryptocurrency
NPR's Michel Martin speaks with media studies professor Lana Swartz about Facebook's proposed currency, Libra.
Posted: 2019-06-22 19:55:03
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Amazon Explores Having Its Drones Provide 'Home Surveillance' For Customers
The tech giant is moving closer to a future in which customers order drones to hover around a home and scan for things like a garage door left open, a broken window, graffiti or a fire.
Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:00
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Hackers Use Ransomware To Attack Cities
NPR's Scott Simon talks with CNBC cybersecurity reporter Kate Fazzini about recent ransomware attacks on U.S. cities including Baltimore, Md., and Riviera Beach, Fla.
Posted: 2019-06-21 10:00:45
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Ever Plugged A USB In Wrong? Of Course You Have. Here's Why
It's often hard to plug in a USB device on the first try. Ajay Bhatt, the chief inventor of the USB, agrees the design is annoying but says there was a good reason for it.
Posted: 2019-06-20 20:21:00
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YouTube Under Fire For Collecting Data On Young Children Without Parental Consent
YouTube is under fire for collecting data on children and may face a federal investigation. Consumer groups allege that YouTube exposes children to inappropriate content and fails to police videos.
Posted: 2019-06-19 22:36:53
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Putting A Price On Chat: Slack Is Going Public At $16 Billion Value
In just five years, Slack has grown to more than 10 million users and become a verb in the process. "I'll Slack you" is shorthand for sending a message via the chat platform. Now it's going public.
Posted: 2019-06-19 11:07:00
www.npr.org
Why The American Shoe Disappeared And Why It's So Hard To Bring It Back
Footwear companies face big costs in potential new tariffs on more Chinese imports. Almost all shoes sold in the U.S. are made overseas. Only about 200 factories remain. One man tried to change...

Posted: 2019-06-23 18:30:57
www.sciencedaily.com
Researchers have discovered bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, living in their kitchen sponges. As the threat of antibiotic resistance increases, bacteriophages, or phages for short,...
Posted: 2019-06-21 18:03:37
www.sciencedaily.com
Magnetic disturbances caused by phenomena like the northern lights can be tracked by a 'social network' of ground-based instruments, according to a new study.
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:35:40
www.sciencedaily.com
Physicists have harnessed the phenomenon of 'quantum squeezing' to amplify and measure trillionths-of-a-meter motions of a lone trapped magnesium ion (electrically charged atom).
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:35:38
www.sciencedaily.com
Animals' brain activity 'syncs' during social interactions
Egyptian fruit bats and mice, respectively, can 'sync' brainwaves in social situations. The synchronization of neural activity in the brains of human conversation partners has been shown previously,...
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:34:48
www.sciencedaily.com
Electron-behaving nanoparticles rock current understanding of matter
Researchers have made a strange and startling discovery that nanoparticles engineered with DNA in colloidal crystals -- when extremely small -- behave just like electrons.
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:34:47
www.sciencedaily.com
Moral concerns override desire to profit from finding a lost wallet
The setup of a research study was a bit like the popular ABC television program 'What Would You Do?' -- minus the television cameras and big reveal in the end.
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:34:37
www.sciencedaily.com
'Robot blood' powers machines for lengthy tasks
Researchers have created a system of circulating liquid -- 'robot blood' -- within robotic structures, to store energy and power robotic applications for sophisticated, long-duration tasks.
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:34:35
www.sciencedaily.com
Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material
Scientists have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures may yield unique optical,...
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:14:31
www.sciencedaily.com
Spiders risk everything for love
A biology study finds that blue jays can easily spot wolf spiders engaged in their courtship rituals. The results demonstrate the powerful influence of sexual selection.
Posted: 2019-06-20 14:00:11
www.sciencedaily.com
Narwhals and belugas can interbreed
A team of researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History...

Posted: 2019-06-21 18:03:41
www.sciencedaily.com
In a new survey of the sub-seafloor off the U.S. Northeast coast, scientists have made a surprising discovery: a gigantic aquifer of relatively fresh water trapped in porous sediments lying below...
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:35:44
www.sciencedaily.com
Two telescopes have measured the faint heat from the main, or epsilon ring, of Uranus, enabling astronomers for the first time to determine its temperature: a cool 77 Kelvin. Earlier images of...
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:35:38
www.sciencedaily.com
Egyptian fruit bats and mice, respectively, can 'sync' brainwaves in social situations. The synchronization of neural activity in the brains of human conversation partners has been shown previously,...
Posted: 2019-06-20 14:00:15
www.sciencedaily.com
Discovery of a 'holy grail' with the invention of universal computer memory
A new type of computer memory to solve the digital technology energy crisis has been invented and patented by scientists. The device is the realization of the decades long search for a 'Universal...
Posted: 2019-06-20 14:00:11
www.sciencedaily.com
Narwhals and belugas can interbreed
A team of researchers has compiled the first and only evidence that narwhals and beluga whales can breed successfully. DNA and stable isotope analysis of an anomalous skull from the Natural History...
Posted: 2019-06-20 03:23:24
www.sciencedaily.com
Fresh look at mysterious Nasca lines in Peru
Using a taxonomic approach, scientists have re-identified the huge birds drawn on the desert plains of Peru as hermits or pelicans.
Posted: 2019-06-19 18:25:42
www.sciencedaily.com
First-ever successful mind-controlled robotic arm without brain implants
Researchers have made a breakthrough in the field of noninvasive robotic device control. Using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI), researchers have developed the first-ever successful...
Posted: 2019-06-19 18:25:38
www.sciencedaily.com
Melting of Himalayan glaciers has doubled in recent years
A newly comprehensive study shows that melting of Himalayan glaciers caused by rising temperatures has accelerated dramatically since the start of the 21st century.
Posted: 2019-06-19 18:25:36
www.sciencedaily.com
New research shows an iceless Greenland may be in our future
New research shows that Greenland may be ice-free by the year 3000. This research uses new data on the landscape under the ice to make breakthroughs in modeling the island's future. The findings...
Posted: 2019-06-19 18:25:32
www.sciencedaily.com
U.S. beekeepers lost over 40 percent of colonies last year, highest winter losses ever recorded
Beekeepers across the United States lost 40.7 percent of their honey bee colonies from April 2018 to April 2019, according to preliminary results of the latest annual nationwide survey conducted...