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Posted: 2020-01-19 20:16:50
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NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and SpaceX's Elon Musk called the test of the Crew Dragon capsule a success. NASA hopes to use the capsule to bring astronauts to the International Space Station.
Posted: 2020-01-16 10:06:10
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Forty mice spent more than a month in orbit to test two approaches to strengthening muscle and bone in microgravity conditions. The results could help people with muscle and bone diseases.
Posted: 2020-01-14 23:12:57
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Promising to try to avert war from outer space through strength, Gen. John "Jay" Raymond was sworn in as the first commander of the newly created United States Space Force.
Posted: 2020-01-11 12:48:00
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NASA Intern Discovers New Planet
NPR's Scott Simon talks with Wolf Cukier, a high school senior from Scarsdale, N.Y., who discovered a new planet just days into an internship with NASA.
Posted: 2020-01-08 10:56:00
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International Space Station Astronauts Send Cookies Back To Earth
A capsule landed in the Pacific with material from the space station including chocolate chip cookies. They were baked in a zero gravity oven, but astronauts weren't allowed to eat them.
Posted: 2020-01-03 21:11:00
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Astronomers Carefully Watching Betelgeuse Star, Wondering If It's Nearing Explosion
The star Betelgeuse has been dimming rapidly in recent weeks, leading to speculation that it may soon explode. If it did, that event would be a sight to behold.
Posted: 2020-01-01 23:45:02
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India Announces Plans For Its First Human Space Mission
It hopes to become the fourth nation, after the United States, China and Russia, to send people into space. The mission is targeted for 2022.
Posted: 2020-01-01 10:09:18
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NASA Will Try Out An Instrument Designed To Make Oxygen On Mars
The next Mars mission will have an instrument that can make oxygen from the carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere. It will be crucial for keeping astronauts alive and for fueling rockets.
Posted: 2019-12-29 12:54:06
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What's Ahead For The U.S. Space Program
The coming year is supposed to bring some important launches into space. It's possible private companies will successfully launch humans into space, and missions to Mars and the sun are planned.
Posted: 2019-12-28 13:21:03
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Up Close With The Mars Rover
NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab let folks have a look at the Mars 2020 mission's rover before it gets packed up on its journey to Cape Canaveral for launch in 2020.

Posted: 2020-01-22 20:56:25
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Memphis Meats, a start-up company that has just raised $161 million, says it has a "clear path" to bringing cell-based meats to market. Yet the company and its competitors face challenges.
Posted: 2020-01-21 18:01:52
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The U. S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to be told about funding decisions for lab research that could make risky viruses even worse.
Posted: 2020-01-21 11:30:58
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An economist uses a broad range of data from 132 countries to understand why middle age is such a drag.
Posted: 2020-01-20 21:14:00
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NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with Lynn McMurdie, a University of Washington professor and principal investigator for IMPACTS, NASA's new project to more accurately predict snowstorms.
Posted: 2020-01-20 14:00:20
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Patients Still Struggle To Balance High Costs Of MS Treatment, Despite Generic
Drugs to treat multiple sclerosis can run $70,000 a year or more. Patients hoped competition from a generic version of one of the most popular brands would spur relief, but prices went up. Here's...
Posted: 2020-01-18 12:55:09
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Assessing The Injuries After Iranian Missile Attack
Eleven U.S. service members have been sent to hospitals abroad after suffering injuries in Iran's missile strike in Iraq. Scott Simon speaks to neuropsychiatrist Stephen Xenakis about what that...
Posted: 2020-01-18 01:04:22
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Kids' Climate Case 'Reluctantly' Dismissed By Appeals Court
The court said the nearly two dozen young people who were trying to force action by the government on climate change did not have standing to sue. The judges said climate change is a political...
Posted: 2020-01-16 19:58:57
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'PigeonBot' Brings Robots Closer To Bird-Like Flight
Birds change the shape of their wings far more than planes. The complexities of bird flight have posed a major design challenge for scientists trying to translate the way birds fly into robots.
Posted: 2020-01-16 16:04:18
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Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball
Some wolf puppies will unexpectedly play "fetch," researchers say, showing that an urge to retrieve a ball might be an ancient wolf trait, and not a result of dog domestication.
Posted: 2020-01-16 10:06:00
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Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth
Forty mice spent more than a month in orbit to test two approaches to strengthening muscle and bone in microgravity conditions. The results could help people with muscle and bone diseases.

Posted: 2020-01-22 20:56:25
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Memphis Meats, a start-up company that has just raised $161 million, says it has a "clear path" to bringing cell-based meats to market. Yet the company and its competitors face challenges.
Posted: 2020-01-22 14:52:20
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U.N. human rights experts said they were gravely concerned by reports that a WhatsApp account held by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was used to hack The Washington Post owner's phone.
Posted: 2020-01-22 10:02:00
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King County, Wash., plans to allow all eligible voters to vote using their smartphones in a February election. It's the largest endeavor so far as online voting slowly expands across the U.S.
Posted: 2020-01-22 10:01:00
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Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse
In an exclusive interview with NPR, election threats executive Shelby Pierson says more nations may attempt more types of interference in the U.S.
Posted: 2020-01-21 21:10:00
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As Esports Take Off, High School Leagues Get In The Game
Esports is a booming business — and schools are taking note. As competitive video gaming has grown from a niche community to a mainstream industry, states are creating high school leagues.
Posted: 2020-01-21 10:06:00
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Iran Conflict Could Shift To Cyberspace, Experts Warn
After the U.S. killed Iran's top military leader, government officials and security experts say Iran could retaliate with cyber attacks ranging from destroying data to defacing websites.
Posted: 2020-01-20 14:16:34
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Extradition Trial For Huawei Executive Facing U.S. Fraud Charges Begins In Vancouver
Meng Wanzhou was arrested in 2018 as she changed planes in Vancouver. The U.S. says the Chinese technology giant misled banks about the nature of Huawei's business in Iran.
Posted: 2020-01-19 13:02:43
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Election Security In Georgia
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Marilyn Marks of the Coalition for Good Governance about the reasons behind the lawsuit seeking to bar Georgia from using its paperless voting machines.
Posted: 2020-01-19 13:02:00
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Lawsuits Over Voting Machines In Pennsylvania
After an Election Day meltdown last year, two lawsuits in Pennsylvania could result in the state decertifying a popular voting machine ahead of of the 2020 elections.
Posted: 2020-01-18 22:24:00
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How To Spot Misinformation In An Election Year
The Life Kit podcast team looks at misinformation in an election year.

Posted: 2020-01-22 22:56:43
www.sciencedaily.com
New research reveals the impact of smell loss. As many as one in 20 people live without smell. But until now there has been little research into the range of emotional and practical impacts it...
Posted: 2020-01-22 20:43:18
www.sciencedaily.com
Hydrologists diving off the coast of the Philippines have discovered volcanic seeps with some of the highest natural levels of C02 ever recorded. The scientists were working in Verde Island Passage,...
Posted: 2020-01-22 17:21:15
www.sciencedaily.com
Did the chicks of dinosaurs from the group oviraptorid hatch from their eggs at the same time? This question can be answered by the length and arrangement of the embryo's bones, which provide...
Posted: 2020-01-22 16:04:47
www.sciencedaily.com
Brewing a better espresso, with a shot of math
Researchers are challenging common espresso wisdom, finding that fewer coffee beans, ground more coarsely, are the key to a drink that is cheaper to make, more consistent from shot to shot, and...
Posted: 2020-01-22 16:04:46
www.sciencedaily.com
Coating helps electronics stay cool by sweating
Mammals sweat to regulate body temperature, and researchers are exploring whether our phones could do the same. The authors present a coating for electronics that releases water vapor to dissipate...
Posted: 2020-01-22 15:05:52
www.sciencedaily.com
How giant viruses infect amoeba
Host cells infected with giant viruses behave in a unique manner. To gain deeper insight into the infection mechanism of giant viruses, scientists developed a specialized algorithm that can track...
Posted: 2020-01-22 15:05:48
www.sciencedaily.com
Inner complexity of Saturn moon, Enceladus, revealed
A team developed a new geochemical model that reveals that carbon dioxide (CO2) from within Enceladus, an ocean-harboring moon of Saturn, may be controlled by chemical reactions at its seafloor....
Posted: 2020-01-22 13:05:13
www.sciencedaily.com
Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better
Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world's food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the...
Posted: 2020-01-22 13:05:01
www.sciencedaily.com
Ultrafast camera takes 1 trillion frames per second of transparent objects and phenomena
Engineers have adapted a picosecond imaging technology to take pictures and video of transparent objects like cells and phenomena like shockwaves.
Posted: 2020-01-21 18:33:15
www.sciencedaily.com
Walking sharks discovered in the tropics
Four new species of tropical sharks that use their fins to walk are causing a stir in waters off northern Australia and New Guinea.

Posted: 2020-01-22 20:00:21
www.sciencedaily.com
A new study uses machine learning to project migration patterns resulting from sea-level rise. Researchers found the impact of rising oceans will ripple across the country, beyond coastal areas...
Posted: 2020-01-22 18:53:13
www.sciencedaily.com
Scientists have found evidence to support long-standing anecdotes that stress causes hair graying. Researchers found that in mice, the type of nerve involved in the fight-or-flight response causes...
Posted: 2020-01-22 16:04:47
www.sciencedaily.com
Researchers are challenging common espresso wisdom, finding that fewer coffee beans, ground more coarsely, are the key to a drink that is cheaper to make, more consistent from shot to shot, and...
Posted: 2020-01-22 15:05:46
www.sciencedaily.com
Earth's oldest asteroid strike linked to 'big thaw'
Scientists have discovered Earth's oldest asteroid strike occurred at Yarrabubba, in outback Western Australia, and coincided with the end of a global deep freeze known as a Snowball Earth. The...
Posted: 2020-01-21 18:33:19
www.sciencedaily.com
Insect bites and warmer climate means double-trouble for plants
Scientists think that current models are incomplete and that we may be underestimating crop losses. A new study shows that infested tomato plants, in their efforts to fight off caterpillars,...
Posted: 2020-01-21 16:30:39
www.sciencedaily.com
Emissions of potent greenhouse gas have grown, contradicting reports of huge reductions
Despite reports that global emissions of the potent greenhouse gas were almost eliminated in 2017, an international team of scientists has found atmospheric levels growing at record values.
Posted: 2020-01-21 16:29:22
www.sciencedaily.com
Platypus on brink of extinction
New research calls for action to minimize the risk of the platypus vanishing due to habitat destruction, dams and weirs.
Posted: 2020-01-20 16:31:30
www.sciencedaily.com
Dozens of non-oncology drugs can kill cancer cells
Researchers tested approximately 4,518 drug compounds on 578 human cancer cell lines and found nearly 50 that have previously unrecognized anti-cancer activity. These drugs have been used to...
Posted: 2020-01-16 19:41:05
www.sciencedaily.com
Billions of quantum entangled electrons found in 'strange metal'
Physicists have observed quantum entanglement among 'billions of billions' of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research provides the strongest direct evidence to date of...
Posted: 2020-01-16 19:17:10
www.sciencedaily.com
Mosquitoes engineered to repel dengue virus
Scientists have synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. Biologists developed a human antibody for dengue suppression in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, the...