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Posted: 2019-04-15 00:31:11
www.npr.org
Researchers are currently looking for candidates who will stay in bed 24 hours a day, seven days a week for 60 straight days for a study on how the body adapts to weightlessness.
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:03:00
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NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with Jennifer Ngo-Anh of the European Space Agency about their planned study during which subjects will stay in bed for two months.
Posted: 2019-04-12 09:11:00
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During astronaut Scott Kelly's nearly year-long space flight on the International Space Station, NASA scientists measured physiological changes in him and his earthbound twin, Mark Kelly.
Posted: 2019-04-11 21:53:14
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Israeli Robotic Moon Landing Fails In Final Descent
Israeli scientists are studying what caused an engine failure in the closing minutes of what they hoped would be a historic lunar landing.

Posted: 2019-04-17 21:12:00
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The latest advance is not only encouraging news for patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. It's a test case for all those scientists working to develop better gene therapy techniques.
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:01:00
www.npr.org
The cells regained a startling amount of function, but the brains didn't have activity linked with consciousness. Ethicists see challenges to assumptions about the irreversible nature of brain...
Posted: 2019-04-17 14:41:11
www.npr.org
Maria was the rainiest storm known to have hit Puerto Rico. Scientists say a storm of such severity is nearly five times more likely to occur today, with warmer air and ocean water, than in the...
Posted: 2019-04-16 17:59:05
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Climate Change Is 'Greatest Challenge Humans Have Ever Faced,' Author Says
Bill McKibben, who first warned of climate change 30 years ago, says its effects are now upon us: "The idea that anybody's going to be immune from this anywhere is untrue." His new book is Falter.
Posted: 2019-04-16 15:01:00
www.npr.org
First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.
Posted: 2019-04-16 09:05:00
www.npr.org
Scientists Plan To Start Human Trials Testing CRISPR Soon
The powerful gene-editing technique is moving out of the lab and into the clinic. Trials will use CRISPR to try to treat a variety of diseases, ranging from cancer and blindness to blood disorders.
Posted: 2019-04-15 22:05:00
www.npr.org
Microplastic Found Even In The Air In France's Pyrenees Mountains
Tiny fragments broken down from larger pieces of plastic have already been found in rivers, lakes, oceans and in agricultural soil. But very few studies of wind-borne microplastic have ever been...
Posted: 2019-04-15 21:38:00
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'Our Planet' Nature Documentary Addresses The 800-Pound Gorilla — Human Impact
The new Netflix series takes a hard look at the effects of our behavior on the natural world. Series producer Alastair Fothergill says that this is a different, more urgent type of show.
Posted: 2019-04-15 00:31:11
www.npr.org
Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research
Researchers are currently looking for candidates who will stay in bed 24 hours a day, seven days a week for 60 straight days for a study on how the body adapts to weightlessness.
Posted: 2019-04-14 21:01:00
www.npr.org
High Stress Drives Up Your Risk Of A Heart Attack. Here's How To Chill Out
A study of siblings finds those who have a stress-related disorder have a 60 percent higher risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event, compared to their less-stressed brothers and sisters.

Posted: 2019-04-17 09:01:00
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If you're scared of flying, the news of two recent airline crashes might have you in jitters. Instructors who help people overcome that fear say enrollments have doubled since the incidents.
Posted: 2019-04-16 20:47:00
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NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with researcher Jason Polakis about CAPTCHA, the program that tests to see if you are really human, and how far artificial intelligence has come.
Posted: 2019-04-16 15:01:00
www.npr.org
This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease.
Posted: 2019-04-16 14:05:30
the1a.org
Tax Troubles, Tax Triumphs
We talk about the other certain thing — you know, the one that's not death.
Posted: 2019-04-16 11:30:23
www.npr.org
A Guardian of Global Capitalism Warns Capitalism Has A Problem
The IMF finds companies are getting increasingly powerful. Here's why that's bad for consumers and for the whole economy.
Posted: 2019-04-15 19:05:00
www.npr.org
My New Diet Is An App: Weight Loss Goes Digital
The popularity of weight loss apps, especially among younger people, has forced the traditional weight loss programs to revamp their models to include online, on-demand support.
Posted: 2019-04-14 12:03:00
www.npr.org
How Can We Be Sure Artificial Intelligence Is Safe For Medical Use?
Software that can replace doctors for certain tasks has a big responsibility. The Food and Drug Administration is now figuring out how to determine when computer algorithms are safe and effective.
Posted: 2019-04-13 09:00:22
www.npr.org
Under Employers' Gaze, Gen Z Is Biting Its Tongue On Social Media
The post-millennial generation, known as Generation Z, is entering the workforce at a time when 70 percent of employers check social media during the hiring process.
Posted: 2019-04-12 20:21:00
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As China Hacked, U.S. Businesses Turned A Blind Eye
The U.S. has largely failed to stop Chinese cybertheft of U.S. companies, but the companies themselves led the charge in keeping it under wraps.
Posted: 2019-04-12 16:07:00
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Jeremy Heimans: How Can We Harness Technology To Fuel Social Change?
In the digital age, the power of the collective has led to movements such as #MeToo and Black Lives Matter. Jeremy Heimans discusses how we can continue to use "new power" to drive activism.

Posted: 2019-04-17 21:10:27
www.sciencedaily.com
Biomedical engineers have developed a system that can study 10s to 100s of programmed bacteria within mini-tissues in a dish, condensing study time from months to days. The speed and high throughput...
Posted: 2019-04-17 19:37:39
www.sciencedaily.com
A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. To reconstruct this history, the authors turned to an unusual...
Posted: 2019-04-17 19:37:39
www.sciencedaily.com
A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. To reconstruct this history, the authors turned to an unusual...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:28:05
www.sciencedaily.com
Scientists restore some functions in a pig's brain hours after death
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation...
Posted: 2019-04-17 16:00:41
www.sciencedaily.com
Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our Sun
A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our Sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter.
Posted: 2019-04-17 14:28:40
www.sciencedaily.com
Powerful particles and tugging tides may affect extraterrestrial life
Two new studies, one on high-energy particles and the other on tidal forces, may bring into question the habitability of TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets.
Posted: 2019-04-17 14:28:25
www.sciencedaily.com
World-record quantum computing
A world-record result in reducing errors in semiconductor electron 'spin qubits', a type of building block for quantum computers, has been achieved.
Posted: 2019-04-17 14:27:37
www.sciencedaily.com
Biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat
Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin's...
Posted: 2019-04-17 12:46:07
www.sciencedaily.com
How to defend the Earth from asteroids
The Chelyabinsk meteor caused extensive ground damage and numerous injuries when it exploded on impact with Earth's atmosphere in 2013; to prevent another such impact, scientists plan to use...
Posted: 2019-04-17 12:45:19
www.sciencedaily.com
Puncture performance of viper fangs measured
A team that studies how biological structures such as cactus spines and mantis shrimp appendages puncture living tissue has turned its attention to viper fangs. Specifically, the scientists wanted...

Posted: 2019-04-17 21:10:19
www.sciencedaily.com
A small clinical trial has shown that gene therapy can safely correct the immune systems of infants newly diagnosed with a rare, life-threatening inherited disorder in which infection-fighting...
Posted: 2019-04-17 19:37:39
www.sciencedaily.com
A new study begins to resolve the scale and pace of change during the first phases of animal domestication beyond the Fertile Crescent. To reconstruct this history, the authors turned to an unusual...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:28:05
www.sciencedaily.com
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:27:56
www.sciencedaily.com
Coelacanth reveals new insights into skull evolution
An international team of researchers presents the first observations of the development of the skull and brain in the living coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae. Their study provides new insights...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:27:28
www.sciencedaily.com
Why lightning often strikes twice
Scientists have used the LOFAR radio telescope to study the development of lightning flashes in unprecedented detail. Their work reveals that the negative charges inside a thundercloud are not...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:00:30
www.sciencedaily.com
Plants and microbes shape global biomes through local underground alliances
Researchers report that the distribution of forest types worldwide is based on the relationships plant species forged with soil microbes to enhance their uptake of nutrients. These symbioses...
Posted: 2019-04-17 17:00:07
www.sciencedaily.com
Mercury has a solid inner core: New evidence
Scientists have long known that Earth and Mercury have metallic cores. Like Earth, Mercury's outer core is composed of liquid metal, but there have only been hints that Mercury's innermost core...
Posted: 2019-04-17 12:46:07
www.sciencedaily.com
How to defend the Earth from asteroids
The Chelyabinsk meteor caused extensive ground damage and numerous injuries when it exploded on impact with Earth's atmosphere in 2013; to prevent another such impact, scientists plan to use...
Posted: 2019-04-17 12:45:56
www.sciencedaily.com
Need more energy storage? Just hit 'print'
Researchers have developed a conductive ink made from a special type of material they discovered, called MXene, that was used by the researchers to print components for electronic devices. The...
Posted: 2019-04-16 18:37:30
www.sciencedaily.com
New form of laser for sound
The optical laser has grown to a $10 billion global technology market since it was invented in 1960, and has led to Nobel prizes for Art Ashkin for developing optical tweezing and Gerard Mourou...