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Posted: 2019-09-22 12:10:29
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The Dog Who Lost His Bark is a story in two halves, says author Eoin Colfer: "In the first half the boy heals the dog, and in the second half the dog heals the boy." It's illustrated by P.J....
Posted: 2019-09-22 12:10:29
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NPR's Melissa Block speaks to Ann Patchett about her new novel, "The Dutch House." The author talks about her fascination with family bonds and how she maps her intricate plots.
Posted: 2019-09-21 11:46:47
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NPR's Scott Simon interviews Jeff Abraham and Burt Kearns about their new book: The Show Won't Go On: The Most Shocking, Bizarre, and Historic Deaths of Performers Onstage.
Posted: 2019-09-21 11:46:46
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Navigating Culture And Crushes In 'Frankly In Love'
David Yoon's young adult debut follows Frank Li, a Korean American kid who concocts a plan to keep his strict parents from finding out that he's dating a non-Korean girl — what could go wrong?
Posted: 2019-09-19 20:32:54
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In 'Obviously,' Comedian Muses About Growing Up In A Small Kentucky Town
NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with comedian Akilah Hughes about a collection of short essays in her new book, Obviously.
Posted: 2019-09-19 16:28:51
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Exiled NSA Contractor Edward Snowden: 'I Haven't And I Won't' Cooperate With Russia
In 2013, Snowden showed journalists thousands of top-secret documents about U.S. intelligence agencies' surveillance efforts. He's been living in Russia ever since. His new book is Permanent...
Posted: 2019-09-18 19:49:00
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Book: 'Juliet Takes A Breath'
Gabby Rivera discusses her new novel for high schoolers, Juliet Takes a Breath.
Posted: 2019-09-17 20:29:10
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'They Will Have To Die Now' Recounts Retaking Of Mosul From The Islamic State
NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with journalist James Verini about his book They Will Have To Die Now, a vivid story of the battle to retake the Iraqi city of Mosul from the Islamic State in 2016.
Posted: 2019-09-17 17:23:00
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'Second Founding' Examines How Reconstruction Remade The Constitution
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner talks how the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments relate to current debates about voting rights, mass incarceration and reparations for slavery.
Posted: 2019-09-17 09:09:00
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Attica Locke's Latest, 'Heaven, My Home,' Explores Race And Forgiveness
NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with author Attica Locke about her latest book: Heaven, My Home. The story picks up with Darren Matthews, the same protagonist from her previous novel Bluebird, Bluebird.

Posted: 2019-09-22 14:00:17
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Rutendo Tavengerwei's YA debut is a glimpse into the lives of two struggling teens: Shamiso, who moves to Zimbabwe after her father dies in a suspicious car accident, and cancer survivor Tanyaradzwa.
Posted: 2019-09-22 11:00:26
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This month sees the arrival of a handful of bold new graphic novels aimed at young adult readers, with unexpected topics and settings from a contemporary Chinese American community to the Old...
Posted: 2019-09-21 14:00:19
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Tracy Chevalier's new novel follows a woman left alone after her fiance and brother died in World War I. She decides to make her mark on the world by joining a guild of embroiderers at a cathedral.
Posted: 2019-09-21 11:00:28
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'A Cosmology Of Monsters' Blends Freaky Frights And Family Feels
Shaun Hamill's new novel uses the lens of horror to examine the ways we interact and fail to interact with each other, and the way a family can be held together by the very things that tear it...
Posted: 2019-09-20 19:22:00
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'They Will Have To Die Now' Is A Bare-Knuckles Account Of The Fight Against ISIS
James Verini's book will stand up with some of the best war reporting, as he takes an unblinking look at the dirtiest kind of battle — urban combat — and the human wreckage it leaves in its...
Posted: 2019-09-20 14:00:18
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Take A Dark Ride On The 'Night Boat To Tangier'
In Kevin Barry's grim but compassionate new novel, two weary Irish ex-crooks sit waiting in a run-down Spanish ferry terminal, waiting for one man's estranged daughter who may or may not show...
Posted: 2019-09-20 11:00:24
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'Heaven, My Home' Is A Complicated Place
Attica Locke returns to the world of Highway 59 in Heaven, My Home, which finds Texas Ranger Darren Mathews dealing with the disappearance of the young son of an imprisoned white supremacist...
Posted: 2019-09-19 11:01:20
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'Coventry' Touches On Gender, Self-Definition In Taking Control Of One's Narrative
In her first essay collection, Rachel Cusk writes like someone who has been burned and has reacted not with self-censorship but with a doubling-down on clarity.
Posted: 2019-09-19 11:00:20
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In 'Doxology,' The Comedy Is Never Quite In Tune
Nell Zink is a very funny writer, but the comedy never quite works in her new novel, which follows two aging punks and their daughter, from the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the '80s to D.C....
Posted: 2019-09-18 18:03:35
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Racial Tensions Complicate The Search For A Missing Child In 'Heaven, My Home'
Attica Locke's new novel centers on a black Texas ranger's effort to find the vanished son of a white supremacist. Heaven, My Home offers an unsettling American spin on a complicated crime story.