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Posted: 2019-08-21 20:31:09
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An outbreak of plague has struck a prairie dog population outside of Denver. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with research wildlife biologist Dean Biggins about the risks to the region's ecology.
Posted: 2019-08-21 16:00:53
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One of the ways Native tribes in the West celebrate their history and culture is through annual summer horse races. They're known as Indian Relays, and tribes call them America's first extreme...
Posted: 2019-08-20 11:27:00
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One way for Pakistani charities to raise funds is by collecting animal hides after Eid holiday meals, and selling them to tanneries. But militants also raise money by gathering animal skins.
Posted: 2019-08-19 17:42:17
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Maybe The Way To Control Locusts Is By Growing Crops They Don't Like
A lab at Arizona State University tries to find new ways to combat the global scourge of locusts. One solution may have to do with farming practices.
Posted: 2019-08-17 21:08:06
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Marium, The Dugong That Charmed Thailand, Dies After Ingesting Plastic
Marium became an internet hit as people marveled over videos of her being cared for by scientists in Thailand. An autopsy revealed plastic pieces in her intestines.
Posted: 2019-08-17 20:44:00
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Critics Say Trump Administration Is Weakening Endangered Species Act
The Trump administration is changing how the Endangered Species Act is applied. Critics say it will limit consideration of climate change, but others question if there will be any impact at all.
Posted: 2019-08-17 12:00:38
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Fighting Seagulls In Ocean City, N.J.
Seagulls have gotten aggressive on the boardwalk in Ocean City, N.J. NPR's Scott Simon talks to local business owner Randy Levchuk about a new plan to tame the gulls.
Posted: 2019-08-16 13:50:40
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Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?
We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking...
Posted: 2019-08-16 13:50:40
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Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?
In 2018, an orca made headlines when she carried her dead calf on her back for weeks. Barbara King says this was a display of animal grief and explains how this changes our relationship with...
Posted: 2019-08-16 13:50:40
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Deinse Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?
We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking...

Posted: 2019-08-19 20:22:48
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The preview reopening of the Confitería del Molino, a long-shuttered art nouveau pastry cafe near the Argentine Capitol, prompted lines around the block — and, for some former patrons, good...
Posted: 2019-08-09 00:37:12
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Gaza has been off-limits to tourists since Hamas took over in 2007. A veteran Palestinian tour guide leads NPR to see the sites, including a palace, a mosque and a bathhouse.
Posted: 2019-08-02 16:01:17
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Built in 1949 in the Pacific Palisades, the Eames House is considered among the most important post-war residences in the U.S. Now, the family is working to preserve the home for generations...
Posted: 2019-07-30 20:36:26
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See-Saw Diplomacy Lets People Play Together Along U.S. Border Wall
A playdate recently broke out at the fence that separates the U.S. and Mexico, in an event that was "filled with joy, excitement, and togetherness,"
Posted: 2019-07-10 09:10:00
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Renowned African-American Architect Philip Freelon Dies At 66
Philip Freelon, chief architect of the Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture, has died. He was diagnosed with ALS in 2016.
Posted: 2019-07-07 22:35:08
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UNESCO Adds 8 Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings To Its List Of World Heritage Sites
The Guggenheim Museum in New York and Fallingwater in Pennsylvania now belong to a list that includes Machu Picchu and the pyramids of Egypt.
Posted: 2019-06-07 15:25:12
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'Eileen Gray' Examines The Relationship Between Genius And Gender
Even in our current climate, it's sobering to consider how the profession of architecture treated modernist pioneer Eileen Gray. This graphic history is a thought-provoking, if incomplete, reflection.
Posted: 2019-06-06 10:01:28
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'The Plaza' Is A Nostalgic Look At The History Of New York's Most Famous Hotel
Julie Satow's book reads like the biography of a distant relative as much as the history of a landmark building; the author argues that no other building so directly reflects the city itself.
Posted: 2019-05-16 22:46:00
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I.M. Pei, Architect Of Some Of The World's Most Iconic Structures, Dies At 102
During his influential career, the Pritzker-winning architect designed everything from schools to skyscrapers. Known for spare geometric forms, Pei said the goal was to "eliminate the inessential."
Posted: 2019-05-09 17:59:03
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'This Land Is My Land' Paints Sometimes Wacky Human Nature In Bright Colors
Full of playful experiments with composition, and seemingly endless variations on common themes, Andy Warner and Sofie Louise Dam treat self-made "utopias" with unflappable cheer.

Posted: 2019-08-22 10:00:27
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A Labor Department audit found no correlation between the federal system that fines mining companies for unsafe conditions and safety in mining operations.
Posted: 2019-08-21 15:05:35
the1a.org
The 25-year-old has gone from posting tech reviews in his childhood home to interviewing Tesla's Elon Musk.
Posted: 2019-08-20 19:27:11
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China is no longer taking the world's waste. The U.S. recycling industry is overwhelmed — it can't keep up with the plastic being churned out. This doesn't bode well for our plastic waste problem.
Posted: 2019-08-13 21:13:00
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Why Utility Companies Are Key To Slowing Climate Change
Some of the oldest companies in America are in the climate change debate. Utilities are supposed to deliver electricity cheaply and reliably. Now, regulators are trying to make them go green.
Posted: 2019-08-13 20:17:11
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What The Nuclear Accident Near A Missile Test Site Says About Russia's Aspirations
NPR's Mary Louise speaks with New York Times correspondent David Sanger about what the nuclear accident near a Russian missile test site reveals about the country's aspirations.
Posted: 2019-08-13 09:00:00
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Energy Boom That Trump Celebrates Began Years Before He Took Office
President Trump tours a Pennsylvania petrochemical plant Tuesday to highlight the U.S. energy boom. Trump claims credit for surging oil and gas production, but the trend began before he took...
Posted: 2019-08-08 14:06:30
the1a.org
A World Without Water
A quarter of the world's population is at high risk of running out of water.
Posted: 2019-08-05 20:25:00
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Give Up Your Gas Stove To Save The Planet? Banning Gas Is The Next Climate Push
As more cities and states try to cut carbon emissions, natural gas is becoming a target. The city of Berkeley, Calif., just became the first to ban it in new homes, but it may not be the last.
Posted: 2019-07-29 20:24:29
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With An Eye Toward Lower Emissions, Clean Air Travel Gets Off The Ground
Air travel is set to grow dramatically. It will be a while before electric planes truly take off, but people are trying to reduce their carbon footprint now with offsets and "flight shaming."
Posted: 2019-07-26 01:19:04
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California Signs Deal With Automakers To Produce Fuel-Efficient Cars
The agreement is different from plans expected to be announced by the Trump administration that would weaken national emissions standards.

Posted: 2019-08-22 10:00:27
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A Labor Department audit found no correlation between the federal system that fines mining companies for unsafe conditions and safety in mining operations.
Posted: 2019-08-22 09:00:00
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The Sunrise Movement is holding rallies and registering voters, aiming to boost turnout among young voters. For the first time, polls show climate change is a top priority for the party's base.
Posted: 2019-08-21 22:02:00
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More than two million acres of forest have burned in Alaska this year. NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with climate change researcher Nancy Fresco about the impact these fires have on the Earth's atmosphere.
Posted: 2019-08-21 20:57:29
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Tens Of Thousands Of Fires Ravage Brazilian Amazon, Where Deforestation Has Spiked
Researchers say there's been a huge rise in the number of fires compared to last year. That's likely linked with a similar leap in deforestation since President Jair Bolsonaro took office.
Posted: 2019-08-21 20:31:09
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Wildlife Staff Outside Denver Work To Stop The Spread Of Plague Among Prairie Dogs
An outbreak of plague has struck a prairie dog population outside of Denver. NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with research wildlife biologist Dean Biggins about the risks to the region's ecology.
Posted: 2019-08-21 11:00:45
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More U.S. Towns Are Feeling The Pinch As Recycling Becomes Costlier
The U.S. recycling industry is facing a quandary: Too much of the plastic we use can't be recycled, and taxpayers increasingly are on the hook for paying for all that trash to hit the landfills.
Posted: 2019-08-20 21:54:00
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How The Flying Shame Movement Got Off The Ground
NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Umair Irfan, who covers climate change and the environment for Vox, about the flying shame movement and what can be done about carbon emissions from air travel.
Posted: 2019-08-20 21:09:00
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Why Sea Level Rise Varies Across The World
The sea level is rising more in some coastal places than in others. But why is that? It has to do with wind, currents, glaciers and even the last Ice Age.
Posted: 2019-08-20 19:27:11
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U.S. Recycling Industry Is Struggling to Figure Out A Future Without China
China is no longer taking the world's waste. The U.S. recycling industry is overwhelmed — it can't keep up with the plastic being churned out. This doesn't bode well for our plastic waste problem.
Posted: 2019-08-20 17:27:54
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Notre Dame Repair Crews Are Back To Work, But Paris' Lead Concerns Remain
Environmental and labor groups complain the cleanup should have begun sooner, and they are concerned about health risks in Paris.

Posted: 2019-08-21 14:06:30
the1a.org
As America becomes ever more urban, some rural natives are leaving their hometowns, only to decide they should move back and make a difference.
Posted: 2019-08-20 15:06:30
the1a.org
What are voters in Iowa and New Hampshire thinking about the crop of Democratic candidates?
Posted: 2019-08-20 10:30:37
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Economists have long criticized summer vacation as economically inefficient. But one has come to its defense.
Posted: 2019-08-19 20:22:48
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In Buenos Aires, Crowds Line Up For A Taste Of Sweeter Days
The preview reopening of the Confitería del Molino, a long-shuttered art nouveau pastry cafe near the Argentine Capitol, prompted lines around the block — and, for some former patrons, good...
Posted: 2019-08-19 14:06:30
the1a.org
Acknowledging Racism Is A Good Start. But It's Only The First Step.
Scholar Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's new book discusses the current state of American racism and how to combat it.
Posted: 2019-08-17 12:00:38
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What One Attendee Remembers From Woodstock
The late NPR music librarian Robert Goldstein was at Woodstock. We offer his "Parable of the Hot Dogs" on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the festival.
Posted: 2019-08-17 12:00:38
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Project Pluto And Nuclear-Powered Missiles
NPR's Scott Simon hears from Rand Corporation researcher Edward Geist about attempts by Russia and the U.S. to develop nuclear-powered missiles.
Posted: 2019-08-16 15:06:30
the1a.org
Friday News Roundup - International
Conflict in Kashmir, protests in Hong Kong and treatments for Ebola dominated the global news this week.
Posted: 2019-08-16 13:22:16
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Brunch Query: What Does It Really Mean To 'Go Dutch'?
On this week's Word Watch, we take a look at how the term "going Dutch" went from insult to the norm.
Posted: 2019-08-15 14:40:35
the1a.org
What An Inverted Yield Curve Could Mean For The U.S. Economy And Your Wallet
Why does it matter if a federal two-year bond's yield is greater than that of a 10-year bond?