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Posted: 2019-06-24 10:49:00
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Police say the bear in Missoula County opened an unlocked door, deadbolted the door behind him and then ripped a room apart. Fish and Wildlife officials finally tranquilized the bear.
Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:38
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A ranch in Fairbanks, Alaska offers yoga classes with reindeer. An owner says the animals are particularly well-suited to it because they are twisty creatures.
Posted: 2019-06-21 11:01:00
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The skull, which came from Greenland, looked like a narwhal, those whales with unicorn tusks but it had bizarre teeth. DNA tests show the animal's mother was a narwhal, the father a tuskless...
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:00
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Ugly Dogs Compete To Find Out Which Is The Ugliest
Every year, ugly dogs from across the country come to Petaluma, Calif., to compete in the World's Ugliest Dog Competition. Which dog will win this year?
Posted: 2019-06-21 06:38:05
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A 747 Carried 2 Beluga Whales From China To Iceland
Naturally, transporting the whales — each about 13 feet long — was a huge logistical headache. Trainers have been preparing the belugas for the journey and for their new life in open water.
Posted: 2019-06-20 16:57:00
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Legal Weed Is A Danger To Dogs. Here's How To Know If Your Pup Got Into Pot
As more states legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana, veterinarians are treating more intoxicated dogs who've gotten into THC edibles, discarded joints or drug-laced feces.
Posted: 2019-06-19 09:34:00
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'Starving' Polar Bear Wanders Into Siberian Town
Residents in the town of Norilsk in northern Siberia were surprised to see the female bear, who reportedly appeared to be exhausted and looking for food.
Posted: 2019-06-18 22:47:43
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Humongous Horns: Texas Longhorn From Alabama Sets Guinness World Record
This steer isn't much different from other Texas longhorns except it holds a world record. Poncho Via's horns were measured at nearly 11-feet wide, that's longer than the Statue of Liberty's...
Posted: 2019-06-18 08:58:00
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Scientists Explain Puppy Dog Eyes
You know that feeling you get when a dog looks into your face and either looks really sad or kind of confused? Scientists say they've figured out why they do that, and why it makes us melt.
Posted: 2019-06-18 08:58:00
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Whale Watchers And Activists Disagree Over Expanded Protected Zone
Whale watching companies are sometimes accused of "loving whales to death." The dispute is especially bitter involving the critically endangered orcas off the coast of Washington state.

Posted: 2019-06-07 15:25:12
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Even in our current climate, it's sobering to consider how the profession of architecture treated modernist pioneer Eileen Gray. This graphic history is a thought-provoking, if incomplete, reflection.
Posted: 2019-06-06 10:01:28
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Julie Satow's book reads like the biography of a distant relative as much as the history of a landmark building; the author argues that no other building so directly reflects the city itself.
Posted: 2019-05-16 22:46:00
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During his influential career, the Pritzker-winning architect designed everything from schools to skyscrapers. Known for spare geometric forms, Pei said the goal was to "eliminate the inessential."
Posted: 2019-05-09 17:59:03
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'This Land Is My Land' Paints Sometimes Wacky Human Nature In Bright Colors
Full of playful experiments with composition, and seemingly endless variations on common themes, Andy Warner and Sofie Louise Dam treat self-made "utopias" with unflappable cheer.
Posted: 2019-04-16 11:30:00
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How Notre Dame, 'Vast Symphony In Stone,' Weaves Its Way Through Parisian History
Victor Hugo wrote Notre Dame de Paris, or The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in the 19th century to draw attention to the cathedral, which had fallen into neglect and disrepair. It worked.
Posted: 2019-03-05 15:03:00
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Arata Isozaki, Whose Hybrid Style Forged 'New Paths,' Wins Pritzker Prize
Growing up in the shadow of World War II, the Japanese architect became fascinated with how people rebuild. Now, after decades of restless reinvention, he has won architecture's highest honor.
Posted: 2019-02-26 16:06:30
the1a.org
Sex Work And Sting Operations
Who is helped — and who is hurt — by the law enforcement operation that caught up Robert Kraft?
Posted: 2019-02-04 15:06:30
the1a.org
Will Virginia Governor Ralph Northam Resign?
Many leading figures in the Democratic party have called for Northam to step down. Will he? Should he?
Posted: 2018-12-22 13:01:15
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Like Moths To A Flame: Why Modern-Day Guests Always Gather In The Kitchen
Holiday season is party season. Hosts decorate their homes with trees, flowers and candles in the windows to make them cozy and festive. Yet so many parties end up in the kitchen. Why?
Posted: 2018-12-19 21:46:25
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San Francisco Orders Man To Rebuild His Iconic Home After It Was Demolished
Built in 1936, it was one of only a handful of Bay Area projects by the renowned architect Richard Neutra.

Posted: 2019-06-22 17:39:32
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Without offering specifics, the president says he is increasing sanctions as Washington accuses Tehran of downing a U.S. drone and attacking foreign-owned oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman.
Posted: 2019-06-20 09:03:00
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NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Joseph Goffman, of the Environmental & Energy Law Program at Harvard, about the end of the Clean Power Plan, which he worked on in the Obama administration.
Posted: 2019-06-19 15:12:24
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The Trump administration is replacing one of President Obama's signature plans to address climate change. It could help some coal-fired power plants, but likely won't slow the industry's decline.
Posted: 2019-06-19 06:41:00
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Canada's Trudeau Approves Controversial Pipeline Expansion
The prime minister first approved the project, which is opposed by many environmental groups, in 2016, but Tuesday's announcement means construction can begin later this year.
Posted: 2019-06-18 09:00:54
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Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?
Cities, states, businesses and electric utilities are setting ambitious goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions. But it's not clear exactly how they'll do that or whether it will actually work.
Posted: 2019-06-16 21:55:53
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Pompeo Says 'There's No Doubt' Iran Attacked 2 Tankers
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pledges to guarantee freedom of navigation in the Strait of Hormuz, a major oil route where the two tankers were hit.
Posted: 2019-06-16 01:30:24
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Crew Of Norwegian-Owned Oil Tanker Arrives In Dubai After 'Hostile Attack'
The 10-member crew of Front Altair reached Dubai two days after explosions rocked two oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz. Backed by video evidence, the U.S. is blaming Iran.
Posted: 2019-06-07 13:49:07
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Greta Thunberg: Are We Running Out Of Time To Save Our Planet?
In 2018, teenager Greta Thunberg began protesting to demand action on climate change. She has inspired protests worldwide. Greta says it's time to panic: we're running out of time to save our...
Posted: 2019-06-07 13:49:07
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Bruce Friedrich: How Is Eating Meat Affecting Our Planet?
Bruce Friedrich shows how plant and cell-based products could soon transform the way we eat ... and reduce the global meat industry's impact on the planet.
Posted: 2019-06-07 13:49:00
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Sean Davis: What Can We Learn From The Global Effort To Save The Ozone Layer?
In 1988, the Montreal Protocol was the first step in a long process to save the ozone layer. Sean Davis explains the impact of the agreement, and the lessons we can apply to the crisis we face...

Posted: 2019-06-23 12:17:00
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When does it make sense to give up adapting to climate change and simply retreat? A first-of-its-kind conference this past week explored the difficult and contentious issues around that concept.
Posted: 2019-06-23 12:17:00
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NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Fran O'Connor of Sayreville, N.J., about letting her home be bought and demolished after multiple rounds of flooding.
Posted: 2019-06-21 09:08:00
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New York is set to enact plans to battle climate change. It would go further than some other states in cutting carbon emissions from electricity, buildings and transportation.
Posted: 2019-06-20 09:03:00
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How 1 Farmer Navigates California's Strict Limit On Ground Water
New rules in California governing groundwater usage have pushed farmers to experiment with some innovative techniques, including developing micro markets for water.
Posted: 2019-06-20 09:03:00
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Trump Administration Finalizes Replacement To Obama's Clean Power
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Joseph Goffman, of the Environmental & Energy Law Program at Harvard, about the end of the Clean Power Plan, which he worked on in the Obama administration.
Posted: 2019-06-19 18:39:22
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I Spy, Via Spy Satellite: Melting Himalayan Glaciers
Scientists are using old spy satellite images to measure the effects of climate change. They're finding that glaciers in the Himalayas are melting twice as fast as they were a few decades earlier.
Posted: 2019-06-19 15:12:24
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Trump Administration Weakens Climate Plan To Help Coal Plants Stay Open
The Trump administration is replacing one of President Obama's signature plans to address climate change. It could help some coal-fired power plants, but likely won't slow the industry's decline.
Posted: 2019-06-19 06:41:00
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Canada's Trudeau Approves Controversial Pipeline Expansion
The prime minister first approved the project, which is opposed by many environmental groups, in 2016, but Tuesday's announcement means construction can begin later this year.
Posted: 2019-06-18 20:22:58
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How Ohio's Cuyahoga River Came Back To Life 50 Years After It Caught On Fire
The Cleveland river's 1969 burning inspired Randy Newman's song and endless jokes. But its cleanup has been such a success that environmental officials travel from around the world to take notes.
Posted: 2019-06-18 09:00:54
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Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?
Cities, states, businesses and electric utilities are setting ambitious goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions. But it's not clear exactly how they'll do that or whether it will actually work.

Posted: 2019-06-23 11:00:24
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This roasted barley flour has been a Tibetan staple for centuries. When China annexed Tibet in the 1950s, tsampa became a rallying point for the resistance. But will it catch on in America?
Posted: 2019-06-22 12:05:38
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Music historian James Karst explains his recent research into the early life of the legendary Louis Armstrong.
Posted: 2019-06-20 19:05:00
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An uprising around a New York bar, Stonewall Inn, 50 years ago sparked a movement pushing for LGBTQ civil rights. The success of that movement saw a powerful backlash from the modern religious...
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:38:12
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Wade In The Water: An Introduction
Produced in 1994 by NPR and the Smithsonian Institution, Wade in the Water is a 26-part documentary series detailing the history of American gospel music and its impact on soul, jazz and R&B.
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:25:38
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Wade In The Water Ep. 1: Songs And Singing As Church
The relationship between song and singing, and worship and belief in both the organized and non-organized church. Introduces concepts, performing styles and musical genres.
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:25:10
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Wade In The Water Ep. 2: In Search Of The Sacred
One woman's search for the broader meanings of the African American interpretations of religious beliefs as "the saved" and "the sacred."
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:24:34
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Wade In The Water Ep. 3: Steal Away, Songs & Stories About Slavery
African American oral tradition rich with memories, testimonies and songs from the hard days of 19th century slavery.
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:24:10
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Wade In The Water Ep. 4: Sacred Songs As History
The sinking of the Titanic, the Depression, World Wars I and II and the civil rights movement, and the moving songs that arise from the sacred music tradition.
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:23:51
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Wade In The Water Ep. 5: The Power Of Communal Song
The story of African American religious music as a moral weapon, to galvanize individuals for worship and for action in the civil rights struggles of the century.
Posted: 2019-06-20 13:23:24
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Wade In The Water Ep. 6: Lined Hymn & Shaped-Note Tradition
Two musical traditions, originating from Europe and adapted by African American converts to Christianity.